Studies Concerning Glycosuria and Diabetes

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W.M. Leonard, 1913 - Diabetes - 1179 pages
 

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Page 1076 - The diluted urine is now run in from the burette, rather rapidly until a chalkwhite precipitate forms, and the blue color of the mixture begins to lessen perceptibly, after which the solution from the burette must be run in a few drops at a time, until the disappearance of the last trace of blue color which marks the end-point. The solution must be kept vigorously boiling throughout the entire titration. If the mixture becomes too concentrated during the process, water may be added from time to time...
Page 1074 - The mixture is then poured (through a filter if necessary) into a larger beaker or casserole. The copper sulphate (which should be dissolved separately in about 100 cc of water) is then poured slowly into the first solution, with constant stirring. The mixture is then cooled and diluted to one liter.
Page 1076 - ... one-half the weight of the anhydrous salt) are added, together with a small quantity of powdered pumice stone or talcum, and the mixture heated to boiling over a free flame until the carbonate has entirely dissolved. The diluted urine is now run in from the burette, rather rapidly, until a chalk-white precipitate forms and the blue color of the mixture begins to lessen perceptibly, after which the solution from the...
Page 668 - The leading and characteristic features of the morbid state to which I would direct attention are, anaemia, general languor and debility, remarkable feebleness of the heart's action, irritability of the stomach, and a peculiar change of colour in the skin, occurring in connection with a diseased condition of the
Page 1074 - This reagent is about ten times as sensitive to sugar in urine as is Fehling's or Haines' solution, and unlike these latter solutions is not appreciably reduced by creatinin, uric acid, chloroform or the simple aldehyds. The mixture may be kept indefinitely in uncolored glass or cork-stoppered bottles.
Page 1076 - ... in enough water to make about 800 cc. of the mixture, and filter if necessary. Dissolve the copper sulphate separately in about 100 cc. of water and pour the solution slowly into the other liquid, with constant stirring. Add the ferrocyanid solution, cool and dilute to exactly i liter.
Page 1076 - ... of crystallized sodium carbonate (or one-half the weight of the anhydrous salt) are added, together with a small quantity of powdered pumice stone or talcum, and the mixture heated to boiling over a free flame until the carbonate has entirely dissolved. The diluted urine is now run in from the burette, rather rapidly until a chalkwhite precipitate forms, and the blue color of the mixture begins to lessen perceptibly...
Page 1076 - The urine, 10 cc of which should be diluted with water to 100 cc (unless the sugar content is believed to be low), is poured into a 50 cc burette up to the zero mark. Twenty-five cc of the reagent are measured with a pipette into a porcelain evaporating dish (25-30 cm.
Page 1075 - If the quantity of glucose be low (under 0.3 per cent) the precipitate forms only on cooling. If no sugar be present the solution either remains perfectly clear, or shows a faint turbidity that is blue in color, and consists of precipitated urates. The chief points to be...
Page 1076 - With the aid of heat dissolve the carbonate, citrate and thiocyanate in enough water to make about 800 cc of the mixture and filter if necessary. Dissolve the copper sulphite separately in about 100 cc of water and pour the solution slowly into the other liquid, with constant stirring. Add the ferrocyanide solution, cool and dilute to exactly i liter.

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