A Library of American Literature... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1889
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 142 - High o'er the hills of Habersham, Veiling the valleys of Hall, The hickory told me manifold Fair tales of shade, the poplar tall Wrought me her shadowy self to hold, The chestnut, the oak, the walnut, the pine, Overleaning, with flickering meaning and sign, Said, Pass not, so cold, these manifold Deep shades of the hills of Habersham, These glades in the valleys of Hall.
Page 95 - There spread a cloud of dust along a plain ; And underneath the cloud, or in it, raged A furious battle, and men yelled, and swords Shocked upon swords and shields. A prince's banner Wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes. A craven hung along the battle's edge, And thought, ' Had I a sword of keener steel — That blue blade that the king's son bears — but this Blunt thing.
Page 95 - The royal feast was done; the King Sought some new sport to banish care. And to his jester cried: "Sir Fool, Kneel now, and make for us a prayer!" The jester doffed his cap and bells. And stood the mocking court before; They could not see the bitter smile Behind the painted grin he wore. He bowed his head, and bent his knee Upon the monarch's silken stool ; His pleading voice arose: "O Lord, Be merciful to me, a fool ! "No pity. Lord, could change the heart From red with wrong to white as wool: The...
Page 8 - The pines rocked, the storm eddied and whirled above the miserable group, and the flames of their altar leaped heavenward as if in token of the vow.
Page 10 - They slept all that day and the next, nor did they waken when voices and footsteps broke the silence of the camp. And when pitying fingers brushed the snow from their wan faces, you could scarcely have told from the equal peace that dwelt upon them which was she that had sinned.
Page 126 - When I think of the paths steep and stony Where the feet of the dear ones must go ; Of the mountains of sin hanging o'er them, Of the...
Page 17 - ... homely catafalque. But whether from the narrowing of the road or some present sense of decorum, as the cart passed on, the company fell to the rear in couples, keeping step, and otherwise assuming the external show of a formal procession. Jack Folinsbee, who had at the outset played a funeral march in dumb show upon an imaginary trombone, desisted from a lack of sympathy and appreciation, — not having, perhaps, your true humorist's capacity to be content with the enjoyment of his own fun.
Page 143 - And oft in the hills of Habersham, And oft in the valleys of Hall...
Page 143 - Downward, to toil and be mixed with the main. The dry fields burn, and the mills are to turn, And a myriad flowers mortally yearn, And the lordly main from beyond the plain Calls o'er the hills of Habersham, Calls through the valleys of Hall.
Page 2 - Thar in the drift back to the wall he held the timbers ready to fall ; then in the darkness I heard him call — " Run for your life, Jake! Run for your wife's sake! Don't wait for me.

Bibliographic information