The Quiet Therapies: Japanese Pathways to Personal Growth

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 1982 - Psychology - 135 pages
0 Reviews
"A provocative but balanced book that will be of great interest for all concerned with Japan, religiously based therapies, and the cure of nervous disorders, it may challenge one's assumptions about such notions as the nature of 'self' as well as provide insight into life, suffering, and happiness." --Religious Studies Review "The descriptions of the various therapies are informative, vivid, and engaging." --Contemporary Psychology "The penetrating account given in an afterword by George DeVos delineates the important psychological differences between Americans and Japanese that render Western psychoanalysis inapplicable to the Japanese scene." --Journal of the American Medical Association "Will undoubtedly become a landmark in comparative psychiatry and social anthropology." --American Journal of Psychiatry
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Morita Psychotherapy
4
Introspection Therapy
46
Isolation Therapy
66
QuietSitting Therapy
78
Meditation Therapy
91
Conclusion
102
On Boredom Brain Waves and Bliss III
111
Afterword by George DeVos II3 References
133
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1982)

David K. Reynolds is recognized as the leading Western authority on Japanese psychotherapies. He is a former faculty member of the UCLA School of Public Health, the USC School of Medicine, and the University of Houston. His books have been published by university presses (California, Chicago, Hawaii, and New York) and popular presses in the U.S., Japan, China, Europe, Australia, and elsewhere. In 1988 the World Health Organization sent Dr. Reynolds to China to train psychiatrists there in Constructive Living. He currently lectures and conducts workshops around the Pacific, including approximately three months in spring and three months in fall in Japan lecturing and consulting in Japanese. He is the only non-Japanese to receive the Kora Prize and the Morita Prize by the Morita Therapy Association of Japan.

Bibliographic information