The General in His Labyrinth: A Novel

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Everyman's Library, 1990 - Heads of state - 248 pages
9 Reviews
"Gabriel Garcia Marquez's most political novel is the tragic story of General Simon Bolivar, the man who tried to unite a continent." Bolivar, known in six Latin American countries as the Liberator, is one of the most revered heroes of the western hemisphere; in Garcia Marquez's reimagining he is magnificently flawed as well. The novel follows Bolivar as he takes his final journey in 1830 down the Magdalena River toward the sea, revisiting the scenes of his former glory and lamenting his lost dream of an alliance of American nations. Forced from power, dogged by assassins, and prematurely aged and wasted by a fatal illness, the General is still a remarkably vital and mercurial man. He seems to remain alive by the sheer force of will that led him to so many victories in the battlefields and love affairs of his past. As he wanders in the labyrinth of his failing powers - and still-powerful memories - he defies his impending death until the last. --Publisher.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nmhale - LibraryThing

The General in His Labyrinth is a different offering than what I expect from Marquez, one of my favorite writers. Not so much in style as in content; whereas he generally pens straight fiction, this ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DieFledermaus - LibraryThing

Garcia Marquez’s depiction of the last few months in the life of Simón Bolívar, liberator of South America, is an absorbing and interesting read. There’s no magic realism in this one, but there are ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
39
Section 3
65
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Gabriel García Márquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia on March 6, 1927. After studying law and journalism at the National University of Colombia in Bogota, he became a journalist. In 1965, he left journalism, to devote himself to writing. His works included Leaf Storm, No One Writes to the Colonel, The Evil Hour, One Hundred Years of Solitude, Love in the Time of Cholera, The Autumn of the Patriarch, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The General in His Labyrinth, Clandestine in Chile, and the memoir Living to Tell the Tale. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982. He died on April 17, 2014 at the age of 87.

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