The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays: Salome; Lady Windermere's Fan

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Penguin, Mar 10, 1985 - Fiction - 240 pages
8 Reviews
A universal favorite, The Importance of Being Earnest displays Oscar Wilde's theatrical genius at its brilliant best. Subtitled "A Trivial Comedy for Serious People", this hilarious attack on Victorian manners and morals turns a pompous world on its head, lets duplicity lead to happiness, and makes riposte the highest form of art. Also included in this special collection are Wilde's first comedy success, Lady Windermere's Fan, and his richly sensual melodrama, Salome.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Sometimes your reading habits look completely nonsensical. Why would I have read any Wilde? Sure, he was a socialist, elitist wit. But why would I like such a thing? Anyway, I'm glad I got around to ... Read full review

Review: The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays

User Review  - Goodreads

Witty, precise and cunning. Excellent 19th century Irish playwright! I recommend "A Woman of No Importance" and "An Ideal Husband" in this collection. I especially enjoy Wilde's views and satirical depictions of upper class society during his time. Read full review

Contents

ACT I
ACT II
ACT III
ACT IV
ACT I
ACT II
ACT III
THE GRIBSBY EPISODE
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854, the son of an eminent eye-surgeon and a nationalist poetess who wrote under the pseudonym of 'Speranza'. He went to Trinity College, Dublin and then to Magdalen College, Oxford, where he began to propagandize the new Aesthetic (or 'Art for Art's Sake') Movement.

Despite winning a first and the Newdigate Prize for Poetry, Wilde failed to obtain an Oxford scholarship, and was forced to earn a living by lecturing and writing for periodicals. He published a largely unsuccessful volume of poems in 1881 and in the next year undertook a lecture-tour of the United States in order to promote the D'Oyle Carte production of Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera, Patience.

After his marriage to Constance Lloyd in 1884, he tried to establish himself as a writer, but with little initial success. However, his three volumes of short fiction, The Happy Prince (1888), Lord Arthur Savile's Crime (1891) and A House of Pomegranates (1891), together with his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), gradually won him a reputation as a modern writer with an original talent, a reputation confirmed and enhanced by the phenomenal success of his Society Comedies - Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Bei

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