The War of the Worlds - Literary Touchstone Classic

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Prestwick House Inc, 2006 - Martians - 184 pages
This Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Classic? includes a glossary and reader?s notes to help the modern reader contend with Wells? vocabulary, use of science, and British references.Originally written for a magazine in 1897, The War of the Worlds became an instant, popular favorite. Long before our modern fascination with flying saucers and brightly glowing UFOs, H. G. Wells anticipated a close encounter between puny Earthlings and seemingly all-powerful Martians.A flash of light observed coming from the red planet sets the stage for a terrifying invasion, against which Earth?s modern weapons are useless. Throughout the epic battle, Wells points out that humans just might not have the talent or ability to defeat an extraterrestrial rival. Could we become slaves to a race of alien monsters? Will their heat-ray destroy all of London and decimate the rest of civilization? Can one man save the world? The War of the Worlds is a science fiction masterpiece that has fascinated us for more than a century, through at least three different movies, the infamous Orson Welles radio broadcast, and even a Broadway musical. Few books have captured the popular imagination as forcefully as this H. G. Wells novel.
 

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Contents

I
11
II
17
III
21
IV
25
V
29
VI
33
VII
35
VIII
39
XV
81
XVI
87
XVII
97
XVIII
105
XIX
111
XX
119
XXI
123
XXII
127

IX
43
X
49
XI
55
XII
61
XIII
69
XIV
73
XXIII
131
XXIV
135
XXV
147
XXVI
153
XXVII
157
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About the author (2006)

H. G. Wells was born in Bromley, England on September 21, 1866. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a draper, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the Royal College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology. He graduated from London University in 1888 and became a science teacher. He also wrote for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. He became an author best known for science fiction novels and comic novels. His science fiction novels include The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Wonderful Visit, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon, and The Food of the Gods. His comic novels include Love and Mr. Lewisham, Kipps: The Story of a Simple Soul, The History of Mr. Polly, and Tono-Bungay. He also wrote several short story collections including The Stolen Bacillus, The Plattner Story, and Tales of Space and Time. He died on August 13, 1946 at the age of 79.

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