Proust: Swann's Way

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 22, 1989 - Literary Criticism - 128 pages
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Swann's Way, published in 1913, is the first part of Proust's seven-part novel A la Recherche du temps perdu. The author's expansion, revision and correction of the work were cut short by his death in 1922, and sixty-six years later editors are still producing variants of the last three volumes based on working notebooks. The novel's structure was compared by its author to that of a cathedral, and its status is that of one of the greatest literary landmarks of the twentieth century. Sheila Stern's study begins with a summary of the whole novel and goes on to give an account of the activity of reading as part of its subject-matter. Two chapters are devoted to Swann's Way itself, with close attention to the opening pages, and to such topics as memory, time, imagery and names. The book's reception in various Western literatures is discussed, and there is a guide to further reading.
 

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Contents

The matter of A la Recherche du temps perdu
1
The readers in the book
23
Combray
29
Memory and the will
33
The readers role
39
Combray takes on form and solidity the third opening
41
The naming of Charles Swann
44
The rainbow of snobbery
47
Time metaphor and St Hilaire
84
A conceit and its form
90
Un Amour de Swann
96
The name of Verdurin
97
Swann cast out
101
Lies
107
The type of Odette
109
le nom
112

Moral refinements and moral judgments
54
Time and tense
68
Time out of joint
75
Imagery
81
The reception of Prousts novel
119
Further reading
125
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About the author (1989)

Stern is a translator and critic.

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