Architecture and Art of the Deccan Sultanates, Part 1, Volume 7

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 10, 1999 - Architecture - 297 pages
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The Muslim kingdoms of the Deccan plateau flourished from the fourteenth to eighteenth centuries. During this period, the Deccan sultans built palaces, mosques and tombs, and patronised artists who produced paintings and decorative objects. Many of these buildings and works of art still survive as testimony to the sophisticated techniques of their craftsmen. This volume is the first to offer an overall survey of these architectural and artistic traditions and to place them within their historical context. The links which existed between the Deccan and the Middle East, for example, are discernible in Deccani architecture and paintings, and a remarkable collection of photographs, many of which have never been published before, testify to these influences. The book will be a source of inspiration to all those interested in the rich and diverse culture of India, as well as to those concerned with the artistic heritage of the Middle East.
 

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Contents

Forts and palaces
23
Mosques and tombs
63
Architectural decoration
115
Ahmadnagar and Bijapur
145
Golconda and other centres
191
Textiles metalwork and stone objects
226
Temples
246
Conclusion 2 68
268
Bibliography
282
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About the author (1999)

George Michell is the author of "Architecture of the Islamic World, Brick Temples of Bengal," and "The Penguin Guide to the Monuments of India," Volume I. A native of Australia, he earned a Ph.D. in Indian archeology at the School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of London.