Architecture and Power in Africa

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002 - Architecture - 177 pages
2 Reviews

Two of the most ambitious religious edifices of the 20th century are the Our Lady of Peace Basilica in the West African country of the Ivory Coast and the Hassan II Mosque in Morocco. Nnamdi Elleh not only provides a substantial architectural and pictorial analysis of the buildings themselves. Using these two buildings as case studies, he also investigates questions of national memory, urban form, architectural styles, concepts of democracy, social hierarchies as well as the elites who make the decisions to build Africa's post-independence monuments and capital cities. His book is an exciting synthesis of theoretical and empirical analysis that is bound to stimulate debate about the form and content of post-colonial identities in Africa.

 

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For an architectural book it is well written and well cited. There are a few moments of redundancy, but worth a read !

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It is very useful book

Contents

Experiencing the Monuments
29
Deploying the Personalities in the Monuments
57
The Social Settings
68
Funding the Monuments
84
Designing the Monuments and the Cities
93
The Ideologies
100
The Styles of Architecture
112
Urban Design Ambitions of the Monuments
123
The Leaders the Monuments and the Peoples
143
The peoples and the Monuments
144
A Critique of Utopian Art in Africa 19602000
161
Glossary of Select Architectural Terms
171
Index
173
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About the author (2002)

NNAMDI ELLEH is Assistant Professor of Architecture at the College of Design, Art, Architecture & Planning (DAAP), and was a Samuel Ittleson Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study In the Visual Arts (CASVA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

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