Mount Washington in Winter, Or the Experiences of a Scientific Expedition Upon the Highest Mountain in New England--1870-71...

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Page 92 - ... sky bent round The awful dome of a most mighty temple Built by omnipotent hands for nothing less Than infinite worship. There I stood in silence — I had no words to tell the mingled thoughts Of wonder and of joy, that then came o'er me, Even with a whirlwind's rush. So beautiful, So bright, so glorious ! Such a majesty In yon pure vault ! So many dazzling tints In yonder waste of waves...
Page 127 - Producing change of beauty ever new. —Ah ! that such beauty, varying in the light Of living nature, cannot be portrayed By words, nor by the pencil's silent skill; But is the property of him alone Who hath beheld it, noted it with care, And in his mind recorded it with love!
Page 73 - ... agencies of centuries. Between the fragments may be seen clumps of saxifrages, sandworts, and reindeer moss, the same species of plants which enliven the barren wastes of Labrador and Greenland. As far as the upper limit of trees, boulders that have been transported by the glacial drift from more northern summits are common. They rapidly diminish in number and size from that point, and have not been seen above the fourth water-tank.
Page 185 - AM, the wind was higher than during the early part of the night. Some of the gusts must have been above 100, possibly 110 miles per hour. The tempest roared and thundered. It had precisely the sound of the ocean waves breaking on a rocky shore, and the building had the motion of a ship scudding before a gale. At 3 o'clock, A M., the temperature had fallen to — 59, and the barometer stood at 22.810, attached thermometer 62.
Page 110 - Monument,' only thirty rods from the Observatory. One of our party shouted an exultant hurrah at the glad sight of this rude pile, which was erected to commemorate the sad fate of one who was overtaken by the darkness and bewildering fogs and chills of a rude October night. ' Then,' in the words of the eloquent Starr King, 'was the time to feel the meaning of that pile of stones, which tells where Miss Bourne, overtaken by night and fog, and exhausted by cold, breathed out her life into the bleak...
Page 94 - ... wood in the stove ; and it was with the greatest difficulty that we succeeded in rekindling it. During the evening, the wind seemed to increase in fury ; and although the window was somewhat protected, yet nearly every glass that was exposed was broken by the pressure of the gale. As the lights were broken, the fire was again extinguished ; and even my hurricane lantern was blown out as quickly as if the flame had been unprotected.
Page 290 - ... lie The happy islands of the upper sky, The halcyon shores of thine Atlantides. Anon the airy headlands change, and drift Into sublimer forms, that slowly heave Their toppling masses up the front of eve, Crag heaped on crag, with many a fiery rift, And hoary summits, throned beyond the reach Of Alp or Caucasus : again they change, And down the vast, interminable range Of towers and palaces, transcending each The workmanship of Fable-Land, we see The
Page 289 - Into sublimer forms, that slowly heave Their toppling masses up the front of eve, Crag heaped on crag, with many a fiery rift, And hoary summits, throned beyond the reach Of Alp or Caucasus; again they change, And down the vast, interminable range . Of towers and palaces, transcending each The workmanship of Fable-Land, we see The " crystal hyaline " of Heaven's own floor — The radiance of the far Eternity Reflected on thy shore!
Page 310 - Armagh, which consists essentially of four hemispherical cups, having their diametrical planes exposed to a passing current of air; they are carried by four folding horizontal arms attached to a vertical shaft or axis, which is caused to rotate by the motion of the Dr.

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