The anatomy of the external forms of man, ed. with additions by R. Knox. [With] Atlas [and] Plates

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H. Bailliere, 1849 - 28 pages
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Missing all the figures and plates that are brilliantly conceived and executed in Dr Fau's book.

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Page 272 - Unto the pure all things are pure: but unto them that are defiled and unbelieving is nothing pure; hut even their mind and conscience is defiled.
Page 214 - The Parthenon, with its sculptures, constituted an immortal work, never again perhaps to be approached by human thoughts or hands. Though mutilated to a great extent, the fragments of the figures which once adorned the Parthenon cannot be too often drawn. The superiority of the Elgin Marbles to all others consists in this, that they represent the human frame draped and undraped, massive, and beyond the natural size, in nearly every attitude, without the artist having in a single instance degenerated...
Page 10 - The Natural History of Man ; comprising Inquiries into the Modifying Influence of Physical and Moral Agencies on the different Tribes of the Human Family. By James Cowles Prichard...
Page 103 - ... not amalgamate. FORM. The external appearance of objects — the quality that distinguishes one thing from another. FORM, in painting, signifies especially the human body. The study of forms, and the changes they undergo by muscular contractions, require on the part of the artist the utmost attention and assiduity. The conscientious artist ought scrupulously to avoid any tendency to exaggerate the superficial forms of the body ; nothing is more simple, more calm ; nothing shows a grander breadth...
Page 99 - The study of forms, and the changes they undergo by muscular contractions, require on the part of the artist the utmost attention and assiduity. The conscientious artist ought scrupulously to avoid any tendency to exaggerate the superficial forms of the body : nothing is more simple, more calm ; nothing shows a grander breadth of design than the human body ; the muscles assist by their reunion in the production of general forms : the special forms are scarcely visible.
Page 21 - There was a fixed and lancinating pain in a hollow between the cartilages of the fifth and sixth ribs of the left side; pain under the margin of the ribs of the right side, considerable difficulty of breathing, and frequent violent palpitations. The headaches were almost incessant, and often nearly distracting by their violence. There was pain upon pressure throughout the cervical and dorsal vertebrae ; and pressure...
Page 88 - From the shoulder joint to that of the wrist . 2 „ „ wrist joint to the extremity of the middle finger . ... 1 „ „ genital parts to the sole of the foot . 4 The hands are as long as the face, and are divided into three lengths of the nose, with an additional length for the wrist. The...
Page 89 - The foot being equal to four parts, the little toe commences at the last third of the third part, and does not extend beyond the half of the phalanx of the great toe.
Page 90 - ... with the supra-sternal fossette it is as wide again; at the commencement of the shoulders, the width of the neck equals a half of the five parts into which the length of the head and neck may be divided. From one shoulder to the other we reckon two heads; the diameter of the haunches on a line with the navel, as well as the width between the trochanters, measures six parts. Viewed in profile, we find five...
Page 183 - Scotch terrier, supposed to be mad ; the cicatrices of two wounds were visible, one on the inner, the other on the outer side of the...

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