The Origins of the Christian Mystical Tradition: From Plato to Denys

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OUP Oxford, Jan 25, 2007 - Religion - 256 pages
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Scholars of the patristic era have paid more attention to the dogmatic tradition in their period than to the development of Christian mystical theology. Andrew Louth aims to redress the balance. Recognizing that the intellectual form of this tradition was decisively influenced by Platonic ideas of the soul's relationship to God, Louth begins with an examination of Plato and Platonism. The discussion of the Fathers which follows shows how the mystical tradition is at the heart of their thought and how the dogmatic tradition both moulds and is the reflection of mystical insights and concerns. This new edition of a classic study of the diverse influences upon Christian spirituality includes a new Epilogue which brings the text completely up to date.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LudieGrace - LibraryThing

The early chapters on Platonism were helpful (and throughout, he does a good job of showing where the Christian tradition departs--often sharply!--from inherited Platonist ideas). The 2006 epilogue is worth a careful read as well. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
IPlato
IIPhilo
ii
IIIPlotinus
iii
IVOrigen
iv
VNicene Orthodoxy
v
VIThe Monastic Contribution
vi
EVAGRIUS OF PONTUS
vi
VIIIDenys the Areopagite
viii
IXPatristic Mysticism and St John of the Cross
ix
XThe Mystical Life and the Mystical Body
x
Afterword 2006
xxviii
Bibliography
xlviii
Extra Bibliography
lix
Index
lxii
Copyright

VIIAugustine
vii

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About the author (2007)

Andrew Louth is Professor of Patristic and Byzantine Studies, University of Durham.

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