The national conventions and platforms of all political parties, 1789 to 1904: convention, popular, and electoral vote; also the political complexion of both Houses of Congress at each biennial period

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Friedenwald Company, 1904 - Political conventions - 447 pages
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Page 49 - Resolved, That our title to the whole of the territory of Oregon is clear and unquestionable; that no portion of the same ought to be ceded to England or any other power; and that the re-occupation of Oregon and the re-annexation of Texas at the earliest practicable period are great American measures, which this convention recommends to the cordial support of the Democracy of the Union.
Page 114 - That as our Republican fathers, when they had abolished slavery in all our national territory, ordained that " no person should be deprived of life, liberty or property, without due process of law...
Page 425 - A; and said tellers having then read the same in the presence and hearing of the two houses shall make a list of the votes as they shall appear from the said certificates; and the votes having been ascertained and counted as in this act provided, the result of the same shall be delivered to the President of the Senate...
Page 302 - We are unalterably opposed to every measure calculated to debase our currency or impair the credit of our country. We are, therefore, opposed to the free coinage of silver except by international agreement with the leading commercial nations of the world, which we pledge ourselves to promote, and until such agreement can be obtained the existing gold standard must be preserved.
Page 122 - American people, that after four years of failure to restore the Union by the experiment of war, during which, under the pretense of a military necessity, or war power higher than the Constitution, the Constitution itself has been disregarded in every part, and public liberty and private right alike trodden down, and the material prosperity of the country essentially impaired, justice, humanity, liberty, and the public welfare demand...
Page 97 - This convention of delegates, assembled in pursuance of a call addressed to the people of the United States, without regard to past political differences or divisions, who are opposed to the repeal of the Missouri Compromise; to the policy of the present administration ; to the extension of slavery into free territory ; in favor of the admission of Kansas as a Free State ; of restoring the action of the Federal Government to the principles of Washington and Jefferson; and for the purpose of presenting...
Page 331 - The silver interests began in that year a propaganda to restore the free coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1...
Page 89 - That the Federal Government is one of limited powers, derived solely from the Constitution, and the grants of power made therein ought to be strictly construed by all the departments and agents of the Government ; and that it is inexpedient and dangerous to exercise doubtful constitutional powers. "2. That the Constitution does not confer upon the General Government the power to commence and carry on a general system of Internal Improvements.
Page 243 - In a Republic like ours, where the citizen is the sovereign and the official the servant, where no power is exercised except by the will of the people, it is important that the sovereign— the people— should possess intelligence. The free school is the promoter of that intelligence which is to preserve us a free Nation...
Page 114 - That the new dogma that the Constitution, of its own force, carries Slavery into any or all of the Territories of the United States, is a dangerous political heresy, at variance with the explicit provisions of that instrument itself, with contemporaneous exposition, and with legislative and judicial precedent ; is revolutionary in its tendency, and subversive of the peace and harmony of the country.

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