The Circular, Square, and Octagonal Earthworks of Ohio, Volume 10

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1889 - Earthworks (Archaeology) - 35 pages
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Page 25 - All the skeletons discovered were in the area inclosed by these posts. The skeletons unearthed were all in a remarkably good state of preservation. None of them could have been intrusively buried, for the stratification above them was not disturbed.
Page 13 - ... people by whom it was constructed, the still closer approximation to true geometric figures in the Octagon and Observatory circle excite our wonder and present questions difficult to answer satisfactorily. Take, for example, the Observatory circle. It is connected by short parallels with the Octagon. Most of the south half is yet in the original forest and has never been injured by the plow, but the north half has been under cultivation for many years; yet the wall is quite distinct throughout,...
Page 25 - ... caused it to break in pieces before it could be placed upon the ground. Numerous other pieces of pottery of a similar character were found in these ashes, and it is not improbable, from the indications, that all these ashes were originally placed in pots before interment. A perforated shell disk '2 inches in diameter and a lump of soggy sycamore wood were gathered from the ashes.
Page 25 - No. 15 lay seven feet deep and a half foot below the general burnt streak. It was originally covered with a wooden structure of some kind, for the cores of two red cedar timbers were resting lengthwise upon the body and the burnt remains of probably two others could be plainly seen on each side, placed parallel to those upon the body. This red cedar was still sound, but the white wood which envelopes the red cores seemed to be burnt entirely to charcoal. The indications are that these timbers were...
Page 13 - ... feet. The widest divergence between the line of the survey and the circumference of the true circle is 4 feet. The aggregate length of the chords surveyed is 3,304 feet, while the circumference of the approximate circle is 3,311 feet; adding to the sum of the chords the additional length of the arcs they subtend (0.1508 of a foot to each 100-foot chord) we have a total of 3,309 feet. It is therefore evident that the inclosure approaches, in form, very nearly an absolute circle.
Page 22 - The mound was composed for the most part of clay, mottled considerably with black loam and slightly in some places with patches of a grayish, plastic lime. Cross trenches were run due north and south and east and west, respectively. The breadth of these at the side was from five to six feet, but as they penetrated inward they widened gradually, so that at the center the excavation became 13 feet in diameter. Considerable lateral digging was done from these trenches to uncover skeletons and other...
Page 25 - Nos. 15, 16 and 17 lay upon one or another of the thin seams of sand. "With skeleton No. 1 a bone implement was found at the back of the cranium, and an incised shell and fragments of a jar at the right side of it. With No. 3, which was that of a child about ten years old, a small clay vessel was found five inches behind the cranium. At the left hand of skeleton No. 8 was a shell such as is found in the sands of Paint Creek. A bone implement was at the back of the cranium of No. 9. With skeleton...
Page 25 - ... feet beneath the surface, which had been considerably plowed. Horizontal timber molds a little smaller in diameter, filled, in places, with charcoal, could be distinctly seen lying against the side of each line of posts at the points shown in the figure. These appear to have been cross beams or stays used for bracing purposes. In the eastern trench a gap...
Page 26 - No valid reason can be presented why Indians taught by necessity and practice could not lay off by the eye and by means at hand figures with which they were familiar more correctly than the white man without instruments.
Page 25 - It was lifted out of the ashes with great care, but the weight of its contents and its rotten condition caused it to break in pieces before it could be placed upon the ground. Numerous other pieces of pottery of a similar character were found in these ashes, and it is not improbable, from the indications, that all these ashes were originally placed in pots before interment. A perforated shell...

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