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Mario Chiefs would give a better representation of the atomic events do to there relative proximity. Rhodes bombards one with Scientific notation to the number 21, while not ever engaging the people who died for the making of the bomb. It is definitely a platter served up like Seadar dinner, never changing and widely accepted by a few. Conveniently explained in a pure scientific manner as if that is all there is to it.
Forget H.G. Wells and follow authors like Julies Verne, and J.M. Barrie for a better of our future. You won't get a head ache and keep a dictionary by your side to look up a word on every other page.
A hard hitting account of a NICE WAY TO BUILD A BOMB

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Welcome to the Machine
Toward the end of this momentous, detailed narrative of how the atomic bomb was conceived & executed, I grappled with how I might succinctly share my impressions of its
magnitude. In an obliquely inspired & somewhat ironically hinged connection I thought of Pink Floyd's "Welcome to the Machine." At the time, the eponymous named tune of the album, presented my son & I a unique opportunity - a rocket ship ride to the stars. I'd pull our large stereo speakers close together & the two of us (Jason was 3 at the time) would lie down on the floor as I cranked up the volume. For those familiar with the stadium pleasing anthem you might recall that given the right leap of fancy, it was quite possible to imagine the opening overture as the sounds associated with a rocket blasting off into space. And then came the haunting lyrics that echoed in my ears as I finished reading this terrifying tome: "Welcome my son, welcome to the machine. Where have you been? It's alright we know where you've been, You've been in the pipeline, filling in time ..."
And so have we all since a coterie of this planet's most brilliant physicists ushered into our world the discovery of nuclear fission.What Rhodes does a brilliant job of is to magnify in excruciating detail both the level of complexity & the dedication of our national resources to creating our first weapon of mass destruction. While conceived over a decade and a half, the bulk of the atomic bomb project occurred at the Los Alamos labs in Santa Fe, New Mexico. At the height of its production powers the lab exceeded in funds spent & materials produced by the entire automotive industry. It was no small task to create an atomic bomb. Indeed, it was a Herculean effort to produce this machine of death -perhaps the most ingenious & evil creation hatched in the 20th century. By the conclusion of this important & at times difficult to digest story (Rhodes goes into great technical detail - much of which floated beyond my comprehension) the reader understands quite well that a door has been opened that can never again, be closed.

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