Uncle Tom's Cabin: Or, Life Among the Lowly, Volume 1

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John P. Jewett, 1852 - African Americans
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Contents

I
13
II
27
III
31
IV
38
V
54
VI
66
VII
79
VIII
97
X
140
XI
154
XII
172
XIII
195
XIV
207
XV
221
XVI
243
XVII
268

IX
118
XVIII
291

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Page 278 - Until I went into the sanctuary of God ; then understood I their end. Surely thou didst set them in slippery places : thou castedst them down into destruction.
Page 278 - When I thought to know this, it was too painful for me, Until I went into the sanctuary of God ; then understood I their end.
Page 209 - O'er life — too sweet an image for such glass ! A lovely being, scarcely formed or moulded ; A rose with all its sweetest leaves yet folded.
Page x - For he shall deliver the needy when he crieth; the poor also, and him that hath no helper.
Page ix - The object of these sketches is to awaken sympathy and feeling for the African race, as they exist among us ; to show their wrongs and sorrows, under a system so necessarily cruel and unjust as to defeat and do away the good effects of all that can be attempted for them, by their best friends, under it.
Page 17 - twas as good as a meetin', now, really, to hear that critter pray; and he was quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a good sum, too, for I bought him cheap of a man that was 'bliged to sell out; so I realized six hundred on him. Yes, I consider religion a valeyable thing in a nigger, when it's the genuine article, and no mistake.
Page 278 - Nevertheless I am continually with thee: thou hast holden me by my right hand. Thou shalt guide me with thy counsel, and afterward receive me to glory.
Page x - He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till he have set judgment in the earth: and the isles shall wait for his law.
Page 96 - Ohio side, and a man helping her up the bank. " Yer a brave gal, now, whoever ye ar!" said the man, with an oath. Eliza recognized the voice and face of a man who owned a farm not far from her old home. " Oh, Mr. Symmes ! — save me — do save me — do hide me ! " said Eliza. "Why, what's this?" said the man. "Why, if tan't Shelby's gal !" "My child!— this boy !— he'd sold him! There is his Mas'r," said she, pointing to the Kentucky shore.
Page 86 - Well, take him into this room," said the woman, opening into a small bedroom, where stood a comfortable bed. Eliza laid the weary boy upon it, and held his hand in hers till he was fast asleep. For her there was no rest. As a fire in her bones, the thought of the pursuer urged her on ; and she gazed with longing eyes on the sullen, surging waters that lay between her and liberty.

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