From Asculum to Actium: The Municipalization of Italy from the Social War to Augustus

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OUP Oxford, Dec 6, 2007 - History - 566 pages
Rome's once independent Italian allies became communities of a new Roman territorial state after the Social War of 91-87 BC. Edward Bispham examines how the transition from independence to subordination was managed, and how, between the opposing tensions of local particularism, competing traditions and identities, aspirations for integration, cultural change, and indifference from Roman central authorities, something new and dynamic appeared in the jaded world of the late Republic. Bispham charts the successes and failures of the attempts to make a new political community (Roman Italy), and new Roman citizens scattered across the peninsula - a dramatic and important story in that, while Italy was being built, Rome was falling apart; and while the Roman Republic fell, the Italian municipal system endured, and made possible the government, and even the survival, of the Roman empire in the West.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Terra Italia
53
The Second Century
74
Latins and Italians in the Second Century
113
4 Municipalization and the Politics of Enfranchisement of Italy
161
Municipal Charters
205
6 The Simple Quattuorvirate Nude Dictus
247
7 Quattuoruiri Iure Dicundo
294
Appendix 1 Pompeii and Other Double Communities
447
Appendix 2 Romans of High Status Acting as Patrons and Magistrates of Italian Communities between the Social War and Actium
457
Appendix 3 The Roman Republican Municipia
462
Appendix 4 Puzzles
471
Addendum to Chapters 69
473
Bibliography
511
Index Nominum
549
Index Rerum
557

8 Quattuoruiri quinquennales and Other Variations
337
9 The Duovirate
380
Remaking Italy?
405

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About the author (2007)


Edward Bispham is Fellow and Tutor in Ancient History, Brasenose College, Oxford, and Lecturer in Ancient History, St Anne's College Oxford.

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