Cry, the Beloved Country

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Simon and Schuster, Nov 25, 2003 - Fiction - 320 pages
92 Reviews
An Oprah Book Club selection, Cry, the Beloved Country, the most famous and important novel in South Africa’s history, was an immediate worldwide bestseller in 1948. Alan Paton’s impassioned novel about a black man’s country under white man’s law is a work of searing beauty.

Cry, the beloved country, for the unborn child that is the inheritor of our fear. Let him not love the earth too deeply. Let him not laugh too gladly when the water runs through his fingers, nor stand too silent when the setting sun makes red the veld with fire. Let him not be too moved when the birds of his land are singing, nor give too much of his heart to a mountain or valley. For fear will rob him of all if he gives too much.

The eminent literary critic Lewis Gannett wrote, “We have had many novels from statesmen and reformers, almost all bad; many novels from poets, almost all thin. In Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country the statesman, the poet and the novelist meet in a unique harmony.”

Cry, the Beloved Country is the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son, Absalom, set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. Remarkable for its lyricism, unforgettable for character and incident, Cry, the Beloved Country is a classic work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.
 

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User Review  - eadieburke - LibraryThing

This book was a very moving novel set in South Africa. It is beautifully written with unforgettable prose. Paton is able to mix the majestic beauty of South Africa and the transformation of cultural ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BookConcierge - LibraryThing

Audiobook narrated by Frederick Davidson. And old man, a Zulu pastor in a small impoverished South African town, has lost three dear relatives to the big city. His brother, John, has gone to ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
2
Section 2
4
Section 3
10
Section 4
14
Section 5
19
Section 6
25
Section 7
30
Section 8
38
Section 20
130
Section 21
135
Section 22
143
Section 23
152
Section 24
157
Section 25
161
Section 26
167
Section 27
174

Section 9
47
Section 10
55
Section 11
64
Section 12
68
Section 13
78
Section 14
85
Section 15
94
Section 16
101
Section 17
107
Section 18
116
Section 19
123
Section 28
178
Section 29
185
Section 30
197
Section 31
206
Section 32
215
Section 33
223
Section 34
231
Section 35
240
Section 36
245
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Alan Paton, a native son of South Africa, was born in Pietermaritzburg, in the province of Natal, in 1903. Paton's initial career was spent teaching in schools for the sons of rich, white South Africans, But at thirty, he suffered a severe attack of enteric fever, and in the time he had to reflect upon his life, he decided that he did not want to spend his life teaching the sons of the rich. He got a job as principal of Diepkloof Reformatory, a huge prison school for delinquent black boys, on the edge of Johannesburg. He worked at Diepkloof for ten years, and at the end of it Paton felt so strongly that he needed a change, that he sold his life insurance policies to finance a prison-study trip that took him to Scandinavia, England, and the United States. It was during this time that he unexpectedly wrote his first published novel, Cry, the Beloved Country. It stands as the single most important novel in South African literature. Alan Paton died in 1988 in South Africa.

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