The Shadow of the Great Game: The Untold Story of India's Partition

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Carroll & Graf, 2006 - History - 432 pages
14 Reviews
A radical reassessment in British colonial history by the former ADC to the last Viceroy of British India is important, but Sarila's claim that current Islamic terrorism is partially rooted in Partition has wider implications. Historians have underestimated the role of British strategic interests: fears about the USSR's control of Middle Eastern oil wells and access to the Indian Ocean. New material on figures like Gandhi, Jinnah, Mountbatten, Churchill, Attlee, Wavell, and Nehru are offered.

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This is one of the most insightful accounts on the events that led to the partition of India -- something that has had reverberations for the world even to this day. The motivation of the declining empire to keep 'a part of India' became a driver for the course of events southern Asia. Not merely an account of history, but a wonderful lesson for future generations of politicial and economic thinkers. 

Review: The Shadow of the Great Game: The Untold Story of India's Partition

User Review  - Khalil - Goodreads

A decent book, giving a different perspective on the Indian subcontinental partition, not from the Indian or Pakistani point of view The narrative style is almost RamGuha-esque It gives an insight ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
9
Acknowledgements
13
The Great Game
15
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Narendra Singh Sarila was aide-de-camp to Lord Mountbatten and served in the Indian Foreign Service,1948–85. He joined the Indian delegation to the UN, and was India’s ambassador in Spain, Brazil, Libya, Switzerland, and France.

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