Bruce's travels and adventures in Abyssinia, ed. by J.M. Clingan

Front Cover
1860
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 249 - A murderer and a villain ; A slave that is not twentieth part the tithe Of your precedent lord ; a vice of kings ; A cutpurse of the empire and the rule, That from a shelf the precious diadem stole, And put it in his pocket ! Queen.
Page 123 - Thou shalt not eat it; that it may go well with thee, and with thy children after thee, when thou shalt do that which is right in the sight of the LORD.
Page 236 - It is easier to guess than to describe the situation of my mind at that moment, - standing in that spot which had baffled the genius, industry, and inquiry of both ancients and moderns, for the course of near three thousand years.
Page 324 - ... majestic slowness ; at intervals we thought they were coming in a very few minutes to overwhelm us ; and small quantities of sand did actually more than once reach us. Again they would retreat so as to be almost out of sight, their tops reaching to the very clouds.
Page 324 - W. to NW of us, we saw a number of prodigious pillars of sand at different distances, at times moving with great celerity, at others stalking on with a majestic slowness ; at intervals we thought they were coming in a very few minutes to overwhelm us ; and small quantities of sand did actually more than once reach us.
Page 105 - He appears, by his modest and unaffected narration, to have described things as he saw them, to have copied nature from the life, and to have consulted his senses, not his imagination.
Page 240 - What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her ? What would he do, Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have...
Page 236 - I was but a few minutes arrived at the sources of the Nile, through numberless dangers and sufferings, the least of which would have overwhelmed me but for the continual goodness and protection of Providence; I was, however, but then half through my journey, and all those dangers which I had already passed, awaited me again on my return. I found a despondency gaining ground fast upon me, and blasting the crown of laurels I had too rashly woven for myself.
Page 324 - It was in vain to think of flying ; the swiftest horse, or fastest sailing ship could be of no use to carry us out of this danger; and the full persuasion of this rivetted me as if to the spot where I stood, and let the camels gain on me so much in my state of lameness, that it was with some difficulty I could overtake them.
Page 324 - Again they would retreat so as to be almost out of sight, their tops reaching to the very clouds. There the tops often separated from the bodies ; and these, once disjoined, dispersed in the air, and did not appear more. Sometimes they were broken near the middle, as if struck with a large cannon shot.

Bibliographic information