The Outline of History: Being a Plain History of Life and Mankind, Volume 2

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Macmillan, 1920 - World history - 780 pages
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History of the world from before the advent of man through the rise of Christianity and Islam Read full review

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Page 547 - Open covenants of peace, openly arrived at, after which there shall be no private international understandings of any kind, but diplomacy shall proceed always frankly and in the public view.
Page 548 - A general association of nations must be formed under specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual guarantees of political Independence and territorial integrity to great and small states alike.
Page 223 - are most of them old decayed serving men, and tapsters and such kind of fellows and,' said I, 'their troops are gentlemen's sons, younger sons and persons of quality. Do you think that the spirits of such base and mean fellows will ever be able to encounter gentlemen that have honour and courage and resolution in them?
Page 155 - Good people," cried the preacher, " things will never go well in England so long as goods be not in common, and so long as there be villeins and gentlemen. By what right are they whom we call lords greater folk than we? On what grounds have they deserved it ? Why do they hold us in serfage? If we all came of the same father and mother, of Adam and Eve, how can they say or prove that they are better than we, if it be not that they make us gain for 'them by our toil what they spend in their pride ?...
Page 505 - To-day the United States is practically sovereign on this continent, and its fiat is law upon the subjects to which it confines its interposition.
Page 296 - The body politic is formed by a voluntary association of individuals: it is a social compact, by which the whole people covenants with each citizen, and each citizen with the whole people, that all shall be governed by certain laws for the common good.
Page 593 - Human history becomes more and more a race between Education and Catastrophe' (HG Wells, The Outline of History (1920)).
Page 547 - Absolute freedom of navigation upon the seas, outside territorial waters, alike in peace and in war, except as the seas may be closed in whole or in part by international action for the enforcement of international covenants. III. The removal, so far as possible, of all economic barriers and the establishment of an equality of trade conditions among all the nations consenting to the peace and associating themselves for its maintenance.
Page 547 - A free, open-minded, and absolutely impartial adjustment of all colonial claims, based upon a strict observance of the principle that in determining all such questions of sovereignty the interests of the populations concerned must have equal weight with the equitable claims of the Government whose title is to be determined.
Page 548 - These, then, are some of the particulars, and I state them with the greater confidence because I can state them authoritatively as representing this Government's interpretation of its own duty with regard to peace : First.

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