A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery, Volume 1

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D. Wilson, and T. Durham, 1766 - Electronic books - 448 pages
 

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Page 299 - He directs the practitioner to " introduce it along his right hand, with the point towards the child's head, and fix it above the chin, in the mouth, back part of the neck, or above the ears, or in any place where it will take firm hold. Having fixed the instrument, let him withdraw his right hand, and with it take hold on the end or handle of the crotchet, then introduce his left to seize the bones at the opening of the skull (as above directed,) that the head may be kept steady, and pull along...
Page v - I had received from study and experience. Neither did I pretend to teach Midwifery till after I had practised it successfully for a long time in the country ; and the observations I now publish are the fruits not only of that opportunity, but more immediately of my practice in London during ten years, in which I have given upwards of two hundred and eighty courses of Midwifery, for the instruction of more than nine hundred pupils, exclusive of female students ; and in that series of courses one thousand...
Page 252 - I began to consider the whole in a mechanical view, and reduce the extraction of the child to the rules of moving bodies in different directions. In consequence of this plan, I more accurately surveyed the dimensions and form of the pelvis, together with the figure of the child's head, and the manner in which it passed along in natural labours ; and, from the knowledge of...
Page 203 - The London method is very convenient in natural and easy labours: the patient lies in bed upon one side, the knees being contracted to the belly, and a pillow put between them to keep them asunder. But the most commodious method is to prepare a bed and a couch in the same room, a piece of oiled cloth or dressed sheep-skin is laid across the middle of each, over the under...
Page 252 - ... knowledge of these things I not only delivered with greater ease and safety than before, but also had the satisfaction to find, in teaching, that I could convey a more distinct idea of the art in this mechanical light than in any other, and particularly give more sure and solid directions for applying the forceps, even to the conviction of many old practitioners, when they reflected on the uncertainty attending the old method of application. From this knowledge, too, joined with...
Page 440 - ... with the obstetric art, if not always, at least in many cases. He ought to take the best opportunities he can find, of being well instructed; and of practising under a master, before he attempts to deliver by himself. In order to acquire a more perfect idea of the art, he ought to perform with his own hands upon proper machines, contrived to convey a just notion of all the difficulties to be met with in every kind of labour; by which means, he will learn how to use the forceps and crotchets with...
Page iv - I hope, imagine that such a fund will be insufficient for the purpose, or that this treatise is cooked up in a hurry, when I inform him, that above six years ago I began to commit my lectures to paper for publication : and from that period have from time to time altered, amended, and digested what I had written, according to the new lights I had received from study and experience.
Page 265 - ... this conveyance may be the more easily effected, the legs of the instrument ought to be kept in the operator's side pockets. Thus provided^ when he sits down to deliver, let him spread the sheet that hangs over the bed, upon his lap, and, under that cover, take out and dispose the blades on each side of the patient ; by which means he will often be able to deliver with the forceps, without their being perceived by the woman herself or any other of the assistants.
Page 260 - I have sometimes found the head of 17 the child thrown so much forward over the os pubis, by the jetting in of the sacrum and lower vertebra of the loins, that I could not push the handles of the forceps far enough back to include within the blades the bulky part of the head which lay over the pubes. To remedy this inconvenience, I contrived a longer pair, curved on one side, and convex on the other ; but...
Page 441 - ... also embrace every occasion of being present at real labours, and indeed of acquiring every qualification that may be necessary or convenient for him in the future exercise of his profession; but over and above the advantages of education, he ought to be endued with a natural sagacity, resolution, and prudence; together with that humanity which adorns the owner, and never fails of being agreeable to the distressed patient; in consequence of this virtue, he will assist the poor as well as the...

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