Planetary Sciences

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 15, 2010 - Science - 647 pages
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An authoritative introduction for graduate students in the physical sciences, this textbook explains the wide variety of physical, chemical, and geological processes that govern the motions and properties of planets. The second edition of this award-winning textbook has been substantially updated and improved. It now contains a reorganized discussion of small bodies, including a detailed description of the Kuiper belt and asteroid belt; a significantly expanded chapter on extrasolar planets and what they tell us about planetary systems; and appendixes providing a glossary of acronyms, tables of key spacecraft, a summary of observing techniques, and a sampling of very recent images. With over 300 exercises to help students apply the concepts covered, this textbook is ideal for courses in astronomy, planetary science and earth science, and well suited as a reference for researchers. Color versions of many figures and movie clips supplementing the text are available at www.cambridge.org/9780521853712.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Dynamics
22
3 Solar Heating and Energy Transport
56
4 Planetary Atmospheres
76
5 Planetary Surfaces
152
6 Planetary Interiors
241
7 Magnetic Fields and Plasmas
283
8 Meteorites
337
13 Planet Formation
512
Appendix A List of Symbols Used
554
Appendix B Acronyms Used
559
Units and Constants
562
Periodic Table of Elements
564
Appendix E Observing Techniques
565
Appendix F Interplanetary Spacecraft
575
Appendix G Recent Planetary Images
581

9 Minor Planets
366
10 Comets
405
11 Planetary Rings
448
12 Extrasolar Planets
489

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About the author (2010)

Imke de Pater is a Professor in the departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and is affiliated with Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS) at the Delft University of Technology, Netherlands. She began her career observing and modeling Jupiter's synchrotron radiation, followed by detailed investigations of the planet's thermal radio emission. In 1994 she led a world-wide campaign to observe the impact of comet D/Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. Currently, she is exploiting adaptive optics techniques in the infrared range to obtain high angular resolution data.

Jack J. Lissauer is a Space Scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, and a Consulting Professor at Stanford University. His primary research interests are the formation of planetary systems, detection of extrasolar planets, planetary dynamics and chaos, planetary ring systems, and circumstellar/protoplanetary disks. He is co-discoverer of the first four planets found to orbit about faint M dwarf stars, and co-discovered two broad tenuous dust rings and two small inner moons orbiting the planet Uranus.

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