Perspectives on Formulaic Language: Acquisition and Communication

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David Wood
A&C Black, Apr 11, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 284 pages
Formulaic sequences are more or less fixed word combinations such as idioms, collocations, lexical bundles, phrasal verbs and so on. Study in this area has grown over the past fifteen years, despite the fact that there are no academic journals or conferences devoted to this topic. This edited collection is an attempt to draw together the diverse international work on formulaic language. It features an introduction by Dr. Regina Weinert, a pioneer and expert in the study of formulaic language in acquisition. The authors have an international scope, from China and Italy to Armenia, Canada and Britain. The book is divided into three sections: Formulaic Language in Acquisition and Pedagogy; Identification and Psycholinguistic Processing of Formulaic Language; Communicative Functions of Formulaic Language. The topics of the papers are as varied as the geographic locations of the authors - critical discourse analysis, psycholinguistics, memorization, corpus analysis, specific languages such as Arabic, and even Beowulf and blogging language. This volume represents a step forward for the study of formulaic language, offering diverse, often previously unexplored perspectives from international researchers, advancing knowledge in innovative ways. It makes a fresh contribution the growing number of works on this topic and will appeal to researchers and academics working with formulaic language throughout linguistics.
 

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Contents

Linguistic Psycholinguistic and Acquisitional Manifestations
1
Formulaic Language in Acquisition and Pedagogy
21
Identification and Psycholinguistic Processing of Formulaic Language
127
Communicative Functions of Formulaic Language
211
Index
275
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About the author (2010)

David Wood teaches applied linguistics at Carleton University, Canada, where his research interests lie in formulaic language, acquisition of L2 spoken language and academic discourse, and language teacher education. He has taught English language and applied linguistics in Canada, Greece, and Japan.

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