Choir and Chorus Conducting: A Treatise on the Organization, Management, Training, and Conducting of Choirs and Choral Societies

Front Cover
T. Presser, 1901 - Choirs (Music) - 177 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 30 - ... in good order, and distribute and collect the same at rehearsals. The Director should never perform this duty. It is not proper to his office. It would be wise for him to pay for this work rather than to do it himself. committees in choir work breeds trouble. ' ' If you want a thing well done — do it yourself, " is a saying which, applied to the conduct of the affairs of a chorus choir, has in it more truth than poetry. CHAPTER X. The Choir of Children's Voices ( Boys and Girls). — A well...
Page 73 - Habeneck was not the medium of any abstract aesthetical inspiration — he was devoid of "genius": but he found the right tempo whilst persistently fixing the attention of his orchestra upon the melos of the symphony. The right comprehension of the melos is the sole guide to the right tempo; these two things are inseparable: the one implies and qualifies the other.
Page 163 - ... as well as the conductor, has a responsibility, and will be judged by his work. To the conductor, however, belongs the wider and superior responsibility and authority. The conductor who is really fitted for his work will never be the slave of the metronome. Brahms is reported to have said : ' ' I am of the opinion that metronome marks go for nothing. As far as I know, all composers have, as I, retracted their metronome marks in later years. ' ' A writer in the "Monthly Musical Record...
Page 49 - And the Lord said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. And he trembling said, Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said to him, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do.
Page 73 - And (as already said) that superb orchestra sang the symphony. The possibility of its being well sung implies that the true tempo had been found: and this is the second point which impressed me at the time. Old Habeneck was not the medium of any abstract aesthetical inspiration — he was devoid of "genius...
Page 59 - Pédalier grand,' op. 64, 66, 69 and 72, take rank with his études. [ED] ALLA BREVE (Ital.). Originally a species of time in which every bar contained a breve, or four minims; hence its name. In this time, chiefly used in the older church music, the minims, being the unit of measurement, were to be taken fast, somewhat like crotchets in ordinary time. This time was also called Alia Capella.
Page 49 - Damascus ; and suddenly there shone around him a light from heaven. And he fell to the earth : and he heard a voice saying unto him, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me ? And he said, Lord, who art Thou ? And the Lord said to him, I am Jesus of Nazareth, whom thou persecutest.
Page 73 - I received a good lesson at Paris in 1839, when I heard the orchestra of the Conservatoire rehearse the enigmatical Ninth Symphony. The scales fell from my eyes; I came to understand the value of CORRECT execution, and the secret of a good performance. The orchestra had learnt to look for Beethoven's MELODY in every bar — that melody which the worthy Leipzig musicians had failed to discover; and the orchestra SANG that melody. THIS WAS THE SECRET.
Page 73 - Italian school; its influence upon them has been beneficial in as much as they have thus been taught to approach music mainly through the medium of the human voice. The French idea of playing an instrument well is to be able to SING well upon it. And (as already said) that superb orchestra SANG the symphony. The possibility of its being well sung implies that the TRUE TEMPO had been found: and this is the second point which impressed me at the time. Old Habeneck was not the medium of any abstract...
Page 76 - ... beats. 4. Its metrical and rhythmical character. Singers must have time to enunciate and sound clearly every word and note. When there are frequent changes of key, metre or rhythm, the tempo must be relatively slow. As a general principle, it may be said that the more complicated, the more crowded with details the music, the slower the tempo. Performers must have time to give the music adequate utterance, and the music must have time to impress itself upon the hearer.

Bibliographic information