The Russian Revolution

Front Cover
New York, 2001 - History - 199 pages
3 Reviews
The Russian Revolution had a decisive impact on the history of the twentieth century. Now, following the collapse of the Soviet regime and the opening of its archives, it is possible to step back and see the full picture. In this classic work, the author incorporates data from archives thatwere previously inaccessible not only to Western but also to Soviet historians, as well as drawing on important recent Russian publications such as the memoirs of one of the great survivors of Soviet politics, Vyacheslav Molotov. Impeccable in its scholarship and objectivity, the book tells a gripping story of a Marxist revolution that was intended to transform the world, visited enormous suffering on the Russian people, and, like the French Revolution before it, ended up by devouring its own children. In a concludingsection that will be of great interest to scholars in the field as well as the general reader, the author treats the Stalinist Great Purges as the last act of the drama of the Russian Revolution.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
15
IV
16
V
23
VI
31
VII
40
VIII
44
IX
49
X
52
XX
102
XXI
106
XXII
111
XXIII
120
XXIV
124
XXV
129
XXVI
135
XXVII
141

XI
57
XII
61
XIII
68
XIV
72
XV
78
XVI
83
XVII
87
XVIII
93
XIX
96
XXVIII
148
XXIX
150
XXX
156
XXXI
163
XXXII
173
XXXIII
185
XXXIV
193
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)


Sheila Fitzpatrick is Bernadotte E. Schmitt Professor of Modern Russian History at the University of Chicago.

Bibliographic information