Color Studies and A Mexican Campaign

Front Cover
Scribner, 1891 - 391 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 154 - After the payment of all legacies and other bequests contained in this my last will, I do hereby give, devise and bequeath all the rest, residue and' remainder of my estate, real and personal, to the Orphan Asylum Society in the city of New York...
Page 154 - FORM OF A BEQUEST. I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same in...
Page 76 - I'm sorry you haven't enjoyed it. I have. It's been as good a thing as I ever got hold of. Now give me your address and I'll have your clothes sent to you. Don't you want some more ? I don't mind letting you have a regular outfit if you want it. One good turn, you know — and you've done me a good turn, and that's a fact." But Jaune declined this liberal offer, and declined also to leave his address, which would have involved a revelation of his name. It was a comfort to him to know that his name...
Page 94 - im truly that you 'ave seen ? " "Him, sir? Wy, in course it's him. Haven't I knowed him ever since he wasn't higher'na hoss's fetlock ? Don't I tell you as me and him's fust cousins ? Him ? In course it's him — the gump ! " "Then, my good Stump, you will now tell me of this wonder all.
Page 69 - Carthame in her relations with this unknown but dangerously fascinating nobleman ; and also that he would give some attention to the nobleman himself. This secondary purpose was strengthened the next morning, while the Count was engaged with his coffee and newspaper, by his finding in the " Courrier des útats-Unis " a translation of the paragraph stating the curious fact that the daily walk of the Marquis began and ended at the Broadway tailor-shop. Having finished his breakfast, the Count leisurely...
Page 94 - ... and I've put out my hand to him, and he's turned away short and pretended as he didn't know me and went off ! And they tells me at his lodgin', for I follered him a-purpose to find him out, that he calls hisself a Frenchman, and says as how his name — which it is Stumps, and always has been — is Count Sikativ de Cortray ! " Jaune's palette and brushes fell to the floor with a crash. "Is it posseeble that you do tell me of the Comte Siccatif de Courtray ? Are you then sure that you do not...
Page 50 - ... out of his desire to appear in creditable form at Vandyke Brown's wedding, and, more than all else, out of his love for Rose — that Jaune d'Antimoine registered a mighty oath before high heaven that within a month's time a new suit of clothes should be his! Yet the chances are that he would have gone down Christopher Street to the North River, and still further down, even into a watery grave — as he very frequently thought of doing during this melancholy period of his existence — had not...
Page 49 - ... very well might have been puzzled hopelessly : for if ever a born flirt came out of France, that flirt was Rose Carthame. Of one thing, however, Jaune was convinced : that unless something of a positive nature was done, and done speedily, for the improvement of his outward man, his chance of success would be gone forever. Already, Madame Carthame eyed his seedy garments askance ; already, for Rose had admitted the truth of his suspicions in this dismal direction, Madame Carthame had instituted...
Page 42 - ... with a glaring south light that made even the thought of painting in it send shivers all over you, Jaune d'Antimoine lived and labored in the service of Art. By all odds, it was the very worst room in the whole building ; and that was precisely the reason why Jaune d'Antimoine had chosen it, for the rent was next to nothing : he would have preferred a room that rented for even less. It certainly was a forlornlooking place. There was no furniture in it worth speaking of; it was cheerless, desolate....
Page 73 - ... attractive young woman, whose good disposition toward him was so conspicuously, though so irregularly, manifested : a fear of recognition. And this reason adjusted itself in a striking manner to the queer notion that had come into his mind that the Marquis was an ideal creation, whose reality was Jaune d'Antimoine. The thought was absurd, irrational, but it grew stronger and stronger within him — and became an assured conviction when, shortly after the promenade of the Marquis had ended, Jaune...

Bibliographic information