Nonsense: Aspects of Intertextuality in Folklore and Literature

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Johns Hopkins University Press, Dec 1, 1989 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 228 pages
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From a "comic strip" papyrus dating from Egypt's New Kingdom to the works of Stein, Joyce, and Barth, "nonsense" texts reveal a set of possibilities as rich and complex as the more conventional system of "making sense" from which they are derived.

Examining palindromes, children's rhymes, puns, anagrams, code languages, and other texts, Susan Stewart explores the labyrinthine relationships between common sense and nonsense-- and presents an original contribution to the fields of folklore, literary theory, anthropology, and sociology by analyzing nonsense within an expansive context of the social manufacture of order and disorder.

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About the author (1989)

Susan Stewart is the Regan Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania and a MacArthur Fellow. She is the author of three books of poems, most recently "The Forest," as well as many works of literary and art criticism, including "On Longing and Crimes of Writing,

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