Measuring the Intentional World: Realism, Naturalism, and Quantitative Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

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Oxford University Press, Feb 5, 1998 - Philosophy - 304 pages
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Scientific realism has been advanced as an interpretation of the natural sciences but never the behavioral sciences. This exciting book introduces a novel version of scientific realism--Measured Realism--that characterizes the kind of theoretical progress in the social and psychological sciences that is uneven but indisputable. Trout proposes a theory of measurement--Population-Guided Estimation--that connects natural, psychological, and social scientific inquiry. Presenting quantitative methods in the behavioral sciences as at once successful and regulated by the world, Measuring the Intentional World will engage philosophers of science, historians of science, sociologists of science, and scientists interested in the foundations of their own disciplines.
 

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Contents

Realism and Naturalism in the Philosophy of Science
3
two Measurement as PopulationGuided Estimation
45
four Measured Realism
111
Epistemological Naturalism and the Measurement of Intention
147
six Statistical Testing and the Worlds Contribution to Rationality
175
seven Diverse Tests on an Independent World
189
The Frailties of Narrative Methods
212
nine Conclusion
256
References
263
Index
279
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About the author (1998)

J.D. Trout is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Associate Professor at the Parmly Hearing Institute at Loyola University in Chicago. He is co-author of The Theory of Knowledge: A Thematic Introduction (OUP, 1998) and co-editor of Contemporary Materialism (with Paul Moser) and The Philosophy of Science (with Richard Boyd and Philip Gasper).

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