The Divine Comedy: Inferno

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Penguin, Dec 1, 2002 - Poetry - 432 pages
57 Reviews
The acclaimed translation of the Inferno that retains all of the style, power, and meaning of the original.
This vigorous translation of Inferno preserves Dante's simple, natural style, and captures the swift movement of the original Italian verse. Mark Musa's blank verse rendition of the poet's journey through the circles of Hell re-creates for the modern reader the rich meanings that Dante's poem had for his contemporaries. Musa's introduction and commentaries on each of the cantos brilliantly illuminate the text.

For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
 

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Review: The Divine Comedy, Vol. 1: Inferno (The Divine Comedy #1)

User Review  - Mateen Ar - Goodreads

A work of pure genius; Dante puts a mockery of Hell in words that could not have been better devised, and sets a dark, melancholy, yet not quite sad theme to the poem. In fact, there seem to be very ... Read full review

Review: The Divine Comedy, Vol. 1: Inferno (The Divine Comedy #1)

User Review  - Kristin Schuck - Goodreads

Let's be honest: I'm not smart enough to understand this book. The translation helps. The author kicks off each canto with a "here's what you're fixin to read" paragraph in plain(er) English, then ... Read full review

Contents

Canto I
67
Canto II
79
Canto III
89
Canto IV
97
Canto V
109
Canto VI
121
Canto VII
129
Canto VIII
138
Canto XX
251
Canto XXI
260
Canto XXII
268
Canto XXIII
277
Canto XXIV
288
Canto XXV
297
I
305
Canto XXVII
315

Canto IX
147
Canto X
158
Canto XI
168
Canto XII
176
Canto XIII
186
Canto XIV
196
Canto XV
205
Canto XVI
214
Canto XVII
223
Canto XVIII
231
Canto XIX
239
Canto XXVIII
325
Canto XXIX
335
Canto XXX
343
Canto XXXI
353
Canto XXXII
362
Canto XXXIII
370
Canto XXXIV
379
Glossary and Indexed of Persons and Places
389
Selected Bibliography
429
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Dante Alighieri was born in 1265. Considered Italy's greatest poet, this scion of a Florentine family mastered in the art of lyric poetry at an early age. His first major work is La Vita Nuova (1292) which is a tribute to Beatrice Portinari, the great love of his life. Married to Gemma Donatic, Dante's political activism resulted in his being exiled from Florence to eventually settle in Ravenna. It is believed that The Divine Comedy—comprised of three canticles, The Inferno, The Purgatorio, and The Paradiso—was written between 1308 and 1320. Dante Alighieri died in 1321.

Mark Musa is a professor at the Center for Italian Studies at Indiana University. A former Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellow, Musa is the author of a highly acclaimed translation of Dante's Divine Comedy.

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