U-boats vs Destroyer Escorts: The Battle of the Atlantic

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Osprey Publishing, Aug 20, 2013 - History - 80 pages
2 Reviews

Winston Churchill claimed the 'U-boat peril' was the only thing that frightened him during World War II. The U-boat was developed from a small coastal vessel into a state-of-the-art killer, stalking the high seas picking off merchant convoys, until the introduction of the destroyer escort, and the development of dedicated anti-submarine tactics provided a means of defence and attack against the U-boats. Gordon Williamson describes the design and development of these two deadly opponents, their tactics, strengths and weaknesses, weaponry and training. He provides an insight into the lives of the Royal Navy and Wolf Pack crews as they played their deadly games of cat and mouse on the high seas, gambling with their lives and the fate of the nations.

 

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What about the Royal Canadian Navy? Osprey ignores the Canadians again.

Review: U-boats vs Destroyer Escorts: The Battle of the Atlantic (Duel #3)

User Review  - Sean Chick - Goodreads

A lackluster title all around. Williamson also downplays the Nazi element among the u-boat men, which grew considerably as the war wore on, due in part to Donitz's Nazism and the belief that more ideologically driven crews would ore readily risk death in nearly impossible circumstances. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
4
Technical Specifications
26
The Combatants
48
Statistical Analysis
74
Copyright

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Page 4 - The only thing that ever really frightened me during the war was the U-boat peril.

About the author (2013)

Gordon Williamson was born in 1951 and works for the Scottish Land Register. He spent seven years with the Military Police TA and has published a number of books and articles on the decorations of the Third Reich. He is the author of a number of World War II titles for Osprey. The author lives in Edinburg, Scotland.

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