Biology of the Ubiquitous House Sparrow: From Genes to Populations

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Oxford University Press, Aug 10, 2006 - Science - 560 pages
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After the chicken, the House Sparrow is the most widely distributed bird species in the world, occurring on all continents except Antarctica and on most human-inhabited islands. Although its Latin name is Passer domesticus, it is certainly not domesticated. In fact, it is widely regarded as a pest species and is consequently not protected in most of its extensive range. This combination of ubiquity and minimal legal protection has contributed to its wide use in studies by avian biologists throughout the world. The purpose of this book is to review and summarize the results of these global studies on House Sparrows, and to provide a springboard for future studies on the species. House Sparrows have been used to study natural selection in introduced species, circadian rhythms, and the neuroendocrine control of the avian annual cycle. One current question of considerable interest concerns the catastrophic House Sparrow population declines in several urban centers in Europe. Is the House Sparrow a contemporary canary in the mine? Other topics of broad interest include the reproductive and flock-foraging strategies of sparrows, and sexual selection and the function of the male badge in the species. Anderson also explores the role of the House Sparrow in disease transmission to humans and their domesticated animals.
 

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Contents

1 TAXONOMY AND DISTRIBUTION
3
2 EVOLUTION AND GENETICS
31
3 ANNUAL CYCLE
70
4 BREEDING BIOLOGY AND REPRODUCTIVE STRATEGY
135
5 PLUMAGES AND MOLT
201
6 FORAGINE BEHAVIOR AND FOOD
246
7 SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND VOCALIZATIONS
283
8 POPULATION DYNAMICS AND MOVEMENTS
296
9 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
344
10 HUMAN COMMENSALISM AND PEST MANAGEMENT
423
PARASITIC AND DISEASE ORGANISMS OF THE HOUSE SPARROW
439
LITERATURE CITED
455
INDEX
539
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Page 4 - A species consists of a group of populations which replace each other geographically or ecologically and of which the neighboring ones intergrade or...
Page 534 - Walters. 1995. Single-locus DNA fingerprinting reveals that male reproductive success increases with age through extra-pair paternity in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B, Biological Sciences 260:91-98.
Page 503 - Antibody prevalence of St. Louis encephalitis virus in avian hosts in Los Angeles, California, 1986.
Page 465 - LV (2001) Testosterone influences basal metabolic rate in male house sparrows: a new cost of dominance signalling.
Page 534 - Blood parasites of birds of the District of Columbia and Patuxent research refuge vicinity.
Page 492 - Diamond. 1983. Adaptive regulation of sugar and amino acid transport by vertebrate intestine.

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About the author (2006)

Ted R. Anderson is Emeritus Professor of Biology at McKendree College in Lebanon, Illinois.

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