Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History

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Vintage Books, Oct 30, 2012 - History - 498 pages
From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome—as a city, as an empire, and as an origin of Western art and civilization.
 
Starting on a personal note, Hughes takes us to the Rome he first encountered as a hungry twenty-one-year-old fresh from Australia in 1959. From there, he goes back more than two thousand years to the city’s foundation, one mired in mythologies and superstitions that would inform Rome’s development for centuries. He explores in rich detail the formation of empire, the rise of early Christianity, the Crusades, the Renaissance, and takes us up to the present, through the rise and fall of Mussolini’s fascism. Equal parts idolizing, blasphemous, outraged, and awestruck, Rome is a portrait of the Eternal City as only Robert Hughes could paint it.
 

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Christmas present for my husband

User Review  - luvroma - Overstock.com

My husband read a review of this book in the New York Times and said he would like to have it. I found the best price on Overstock.com and bought it for him for Christmas. He is in the process of reading the book. Read full review

ROME: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History

User Review  - Kirkus

In the spirit of his Barcelona (1992), the art critic and cultural historian zooms through Roman history, from Romulus and Remus to today.Hughes' (Things I Didn't Know, 2006, etc.) subtitle is a bit ... Read full review

Contents

I
43
2
57
3
98
4
136
5
165
6
203
8
277
9
310
II
368
Futurism and Fascism
385
Rome Recaptured
437
Epilogue
458
Bibliography
465
Index
477
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About the author (2012)

Robert Hughes was born in Australia in 1938. Beginning in 1970 he lived and worked in the United States, where until 2001 he was chief art critic for Time. His books include The Shock of the New, The Fatal Shore, Nothing If Not Critical, Barcelona, Goya, and Things I Didn't Know. He was the recipient of numerous awards and prizes for his work. Hughes died in 2012.

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