Models as Mediators: Perspectives on Natural and Social Science

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Mary S. Morgan, Margaret Morrison, Quentin Skinner
Cambridge University Press, Oct 21, 1999 - Business & Economics - 401 pages
Models as Mediators discusses the ways in which models function in modern science, particularly in the fields of physics and economics. Models play a variety of roles in the sciences: they are used in the development, exploration and application of theories and in measurement methods. They also provide a mechanism for using scientific concepts and principles to intervene in the world. The editors provide a framework that covers the construction and function of scientific models, and explore the ways in which they enable us to learn about both theories and the world. The contributors to the volume offer their own individual theoretical perspectives and cover a wide range of examples of modeling. These papers provide ideal case study material for exploring both the concepts and typical elements of modeling methods, using analytical approaches from the domains of philosophy and history of science.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Models as mediating instruments
10
Models as autonomous agents
38
Builtin justification
66
The Ising model computer simulation and universal physics
97
Techniques of modelling and papertools in classical chemistry
146
The role of models in the application of scientific theories epistemological implications
168
Knifeedge caricature modelling the case of Marxs Reproduction Schema
197
Models and the limits of theory quantum Hamiltonians and the BCS model of superconductivity
241
Past measurement and future prediction
282
Models and stones in hadron physics
326
Learning from models
347
Index
389
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