Friendship's offering, or, The Annual remembrancer [afterw.] Friendship's offering, a literary album [afterw.] Friendship's offering; and winter's wreath. (Ed by T.K. Hervey) [and others].

Front Cover
Thomas Kibble Hervey
1839
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 349 - The tear, down Childhood's cheek that flows, Is like the dew-drop on the rose ; When next the summer breeze comes by, And waves the bush, the flower is dry.
Page 82 - Christian land]" (Within.) The skies are wild, and the blast is cold : Yet Riot and Luxury brawl within : Slaves are waiting, in crimson and gold, — Waiting the nod of a child of sin.
Page 82 - What dost Thou in a Christian land ? '' WITHIN. The skies are wild, and the blast is cold ; Yet riot and luxury brawl within : Slaves are waiting, in silver and gold, Waiting the nod of a child of sin. The fire is crackling, wine is bubbling Up in each glass to its beaded brim : The jesters are laughing, the parasites quaffing " Happiness," — " honour,
Page 83 - While the world runs merry as heretofore ! (Within.) He who yon lordly feast enjoyeth, He who doth rest on his couch of down, He it was, who threw the forsaken Under the feet of the trampling town : Liar — betrayer — false as cruel, — What is the doom for his dastard sin ? His peers, they scorn ? — high dames, they shun him ? — Unbar yon palace, and gaze within. There, — yet his deeds are all trumpet-sounded, There, upon silken seats recline Maidens as fair as the summer morning, Watching...
Page 174 - O, let its memory, like a chain about thee, Gently compel and hasten thy return! Linger not long. Though crowds should woo thy staying, Bethink thee, can the mirth of thy friends, though dear, Compensate for the grief thy long delaying Costs the fond heart that sighs to have thee here?
Page 88 - ... extinction of all youth's sweetest visions. Then came the groan of anguish, the shriek of despair — the straining of the eyeballs, to assure itself of that which stretched every fibre of the heart with agony, till it almost burst with the tension. Then came that piercing look into future years, which so often accompanies calamity in its freshness ; when all that would have sustained us beneath the heavy load, has been wrenched from us, for ever and ever ! Vainly the friends who surrounded Isabelle...
Page 83 - Poverty ; misery : Well, — no matter ; There is an end unto every pain ! The harlot's fame was her doom to-day, Disdain, — despair ; by to-morrow's light The ragged boards and the pauper's pall ; And so she '11 be given to dusty night ! . . . Without a tear or a human sigh, She's gone, — poor life and its "fever...
Page 85 - The strong and feverish excitement of the gambling table too well suited the eager temperament of Victor. He who, in the midst of the most profligate capital of the world, had strength to resist all other allurements, fell a ready prey to that vice, whose fatal indulgence has often paved the way for the commission of almost every crime. Auguste, on the other hand, shunning the dazzling salons of play, was a nightly visitant of the metropolitan...
Page 84 - The circumstance which had called for this expiation of life at the altar of justice, are briefly as follows,— and, blended with the strong love of excitement, so universal amongst the French, account, in some degree, for the eager curiosity discernible in the multitude, now hastening to the awful spectacle of a fellow-creature, in the full flush of youth and health, being plunged into the gulf of an unknown eternity. The crime for which Victor d'Aubigny was doomed to suffer was forgery. Remonstrance,...
Page 83 - She's gone, — poor life and its ' fever' o'er. So, — let her in calm oblivion lie ; While the world runs merry as heretofore ! (Within.) He who yon lordly feast enjoyeth, He who doth rest on his couch of down, He it was, who threw the forsaken Under the feet of the trampling town: Liar — betrayer — false as cruel, — What is the doom for his dastard sin ? His peers, they scorn ? — high dames, they shun him ? — Unbar yon palace, and gaze within. There...

Bibliographic information