Digital VLSI Design with Verilog: A Textbook from Silicon Valley Polytechnic Institute

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Springer, Jun 17, 2014 - Technology & Engineering - 553 pages
This book is structured as a step-by-step course of study along the lines of a VLSI integrated circuit design project. The entire Verilog language is presented, from the basics to everything necessary for synthesis of an entire 70,000 transistor, full-duplex serializer-deserializer, including synthesizable PLLs. The author includes everything an engineer needs for in-depth understanding of the Verilog language: Syntax, synthesis semantics, simulation and test. Complete solutions for the 27 labs are provided in the downloadable files that accompany the book. For readers with access to appropriate electronic design tools, all solutions can be developed, simulated, and synthesized as described in the book. A partial list of design topics includes design partitioning, hierarchy decomposition, safe coding styles, back annotation, wrapper modules, concurrency, race conditions, assertion-based verification, clock synchronization, and design for test. A concluding presentation of special topics includes System Verilog and Verilog-AMS.
 

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Contents

Introductory Material
1
Week 1 Class 1
13
Week 1 Class 2
39
Week 2 Class 1
67
Week 2 Class 2
89
Week 3 Class 1
115
Week 3 Class 2
133
Week 4 Class 1
147
Week 7 Class 2
301
Week 8 Class 1
322
Week 8 Class 2
345
Week 9 Class 1
363
Week 9 Class 2
381
Week 10 Class 1
415
Week 10 Class 2
445
Week 11 Class 1
468

Week 4 Class 2
182
Week 5 Class 1
211
Week 5 Class 2
230
Week 6 Class 1
245
Week 6 Class 2
262
Week 7 Class 1
287
Week 11 Class 2
507
Week 12 Class 1
516
Week 12 Class 2
525
Index
543
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

After spending some years at sea in the U. S. Navy, John Michael Williams returned to school for degrees at Columbia University, the University of Chicago and Southern Illinois University, eventually studying human vision in postdoctoral study at the University of Michigan. He moved to California in 1982 and spent significant work time as an applications engineer at Daisy Systems and then at Compass Design Automation. After attending various physics-related classes at Stanford, he began teaching at Silicon Valley Technical Institute, where he wrote the first edition of "Digital VLSI Design with Verilog" and many other course workbooks which now are posted at Scribd. He moved to Oregon a few years ago, where he remains mostly retired.

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