Chemical manipulation

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J. Murray, 1842 - Chemistry - 80 pages
 

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Page 64 - If on the contrary it weigh one grain and a fraction, it will be counterpoised by the heavy gold weight at the extremity, and one or more of the lighter ones placed in some other part of the beam. This beam...
Page 6 - Triflers may find or make any thing a trifle ; but since it is the great characteristick of a wise man to see events in their causes, to obviate consequences, and ascertain contingencies, your Lordship will think nothing a trifle by which the mind is inured to caution, foresight, and circumspection.
Page 63 - The fulcrum is a bit of plate brass, the middle of which lies flat on my table when I use the balance, and the two ends are bent up to a right angle so as to stand upright. These two ends are ground at the same time on a flat hone, that the extreme surfaces of them may be in the same plane ; and their distance is such that the needle when laid acftss them rests on them at a small distance from the sides of the beam.
Page 63 - ... also a number of small rings of fine brass wire made in the manner first mentioned by Mr. Lewis, by appending a weight to the wire, and coiling it with the tension of that weight round a thicker brass wire in a close spiral, after which the extremity of the spiral being tied hard with waxed thread, I put the covered wire in a vice, and applying a sharp knife which is struck...
Page 63 - ... and their distance is such that the needle when laid across them rests on them at a small distance from the sides of the beam. They rise above the surface of the table only one and a half or two-tenths of an inch, so that the beam is very limited in its play.
Page 316 - Such a trough is best made of japanned copper, and supported in a wooden frame, so as to stand about 39 inches from the ground. Two depressions like small wells, should be made in the shelf, each about seven inches long, two wide, and one and a half deep ; they should be placed with one of their narrowest ends about one inch and a half from the end of the shelf which is furthest from the tvell, and about eight inches apart.
Page 333 - ... a piece of glass tube, about half an inch in diameter and twelve or fourteen inches long, the tube descending to the top of the candle flame, and being placed just above it. Under these circumstances...
Page 64 - F, for the purpose of ascertaining the point at which the needle re. mains stationary. This balance possesses extreme delicacy. It may even be made more sensible than that belonging to the Royal Society of London. I have said nothing of the perfect equality of the two ends, as...
Page 333 - The point is then immersed in quicksilver, which is drawn into the tube till it is filled, by the action of the mouth. Placing the finger over the aperture at the straight end, the tube filled with quicksilver is next conveyed through the water with the bent end uppermost, into an inverted jar of gas. When the finger is removed, the quicksilver falls from the tube into the trough, or into a cup placed to receive it, and the tube is filled with the gas. The whole of the quicksilver however must not...
Page 315 - There should be width and breadth enough for two or three jars to be immersed at once, and sufficient depth to permit the inversion of any jar or tube beneath the surface, likely to be in use at the trough. The shelf also of the large trough should be of sufficient size to hold several jars of gas at once. If the surface of water be 19 inches by 28, and a well be formed at one end of 14 inches by 10, and 12 inches in depth, so as to leave a continuation of the shelf surface on three sides of the...

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