Ursula K. Le Guin's the left hand of darkness

Front Cover
Chelsea House Publishers, 1987 - Fiction - 150 pages
6 Reviews
A collection of nine critical essays on the modern social science fiction novel, arranged in chronological order of their original publication.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
0
4 stars
3
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Ursula K. Le Guin's the Left Hand of Darkness (Modern Critical Interpretations)

User Review  - Pau Toro - Goodreads

The essays are of varying quality. Some aren't as insightful as one would hope. Others, particularly the later essays, did give me new ways to think about Le Guin's works as well as how to better express some of the thoughts had already been there. Read full review

Review: Ursula K. Le Guin's the Left Hand of Darkness (Modern Critical Interpretations)

User Review  - Pau Toro - Goodreads

The essays are of varying quality. Some aren't as insightful as one would hope. Others, particularly the later essays, did give me new ways to think about Le Guin's works as well as how to better express some of the thoughts had already been there. Read full review

Contents

Optimism and the Limits of Subversion
117
Chronology
135
Acknowledgments
141
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1987)

Harold Bloom, July 11, 1930 - Harold Bloom was born on July 11, 1930 in New York City. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from Cornell in 1951 and his Doctorate from Yale in 1955. After graduating from Yale, Bloom remained there as a teacher, and was made Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1983. Bloom's theories have changed the way that critics think of literary tradition and has also focused his attentions on history and the Bible. He has written over twenty books and edited countless others. He is one of the most famous critics in the world and considered an expert in many fields.