Text Information Retrieval Systems

Front Cover
Academic, 2007 - Business & Economics - 371 pages
4 Reviews
This will be the third edition of the highly successful "Text Information Retrieval Systems." The book's purpose is to teach people who will be searching or designing text retrieval systems how the systems work. For designers, it covers problems they will face and reviews currently available solutions to provide a basis for more advanced study. For the searcher its purpose is to describe why such systems work as they do. The book is primarily about computer-based retrieval systems, but the principles apply to nonmechanized ones as well. The book covers the nature of information, how it is organized for use by a computer, how search functions are carried out, and some of the theory underlying these functions. As well, it discusses the interaction between user and system and how retrieved items, users, and complete systems are evaluated. A limited knowledge of mathematics and of computing is assumed. This third edition will be updated to include coverage of the WWW and current search engines. In many cases, examples of non-web searching will be replaced with web-based illustrations. Coverage of interfaces, various features available to assist searchers, and areas in which search assistance is not available will also be covered. In addition, the book will have a web dimension which will include relevant material available online, to be used in conjunction with the text. It is a follow-up to the award winning 2nd Edition. It focuses on computer-based system but basic principles can be applied to any information seeking context.

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This online version is especially useful as many of the printed copies of the Third Edition are missing pages. Pages 318-319 are not present. These pages cover key concepts in evaluation of IRS systems.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I too, had to read this in libr202, what a brain killer. So technical that after the second sentence of each chapter I would be daydreaming. I read a lot of first sentences over and over and over.....
However it was helpful to look up quotes here for the final.

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2007)

Charles Meadow is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto. He holds a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Rochester and an M.S. in mathematics from Rutgers University. He became involved very early in database management and information retrieval systems. Later, he focused on the human use of computers, electronic publishing, and communications in general. He is the author of nine books in the computer and communications fields, including the First and Second Edition ofText Information Retrieval Systems. Bert Boyce is Dean of the School of Library and Information Science at Louisiana State University where he has taught since 1983. He has also taught at both Case Western Reserve University and the University of Missouri. Before joining the academic world, Dr. Boyce worked in the Library of Congress. He holds a B.A. in History from Marietta College, and an M.S.L.S. and Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from Case Western Reserve University.

Charles Meadow is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto. He holds a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Rochester and an M.S. in mathematics from Rutgers University. He became involved very early in database management and information retrieval systems. Later, he focused on the human use of computers, electronic publishing, and communications in general. He is the author of nine books in the computer and communications fields, including the First and Second Edition ofText Information Retrieval Systems. Bert Boyce is Dean of the School of Library and Information Science at Louisiana State University where he has taught since 1983. He has also taught at both Case Western Reserve University and the University of Missouri. Before joining the academic world, Dr. Boyce worked in the Library of Congress. He holds a B.A. in History from Marietta College, and an M.S.L.S. and Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from Case Western Reserve University.

Charles Meadow is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto. He holds a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Rochester and an M.S. in mathematics from Rutgers University. He became involved very early in database management and information retrieval systems. Later, he focused on the human use of computers, electronic publishing, and communications in general. He is the author of nine books in the computer and communications fields, including the First and Second Edition ofText Information Retrieval Systems. Bert Boyce is Dean of the School of Library and Information Science at Louisiana State University where he has taught since 1983. He has also taught at both Case Western Reserve University and the University of Missouri. Before joining the academic world, Dr. Boyce worked in the Library of Congress. He holds a B.A. in History from Marietta College, and an M.S.L.S. and Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from Case Western Reserve University.