The Wonders of the West Indies

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Seeley, Jackson & Halliday, 1856 - West Indies - 315 pages
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Page 73 - Why did all-creating Nature Make the plant for which we toil? Sighs must fan it, tears must water, Sweat of ours must dress the soil. Think, ye masters, iron-hearted, Lolling at your. jovial boards; Think how many backs have smarted For the sweets your cane affords.
Page 2 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 74 - Hark! He answers! — wild tornadoes Strewing yonder sea with wrecks, Wasting towns, plantations, meadows, Are the voice with which He speaks. He, foreseeing what vexations Afric's sons should undergo, Fix'd their tyrants' habitations Where His whirlwinds answer — No.
Page 7 - Gul in her bloom ; Where the citron and olive are fairest of fruit, And the voice of the nightingale never is mute ; Where the tints of the earth, and the hues of the sky, In colour though varied, in beauty may vie, And the purple of ocean is deepest in dye ; Where the virgins are soft as the roses they twine, And all save the spirit of man is divine...
Page 202 - Of fish that with their fins, and shining scales Glide under the green wave, in sculls that oft Bank the mid sea : part single, or with mate, Graze the sea-weed their pasture, and through groves Of coral stray ; or, sporting with quick glance, Show to the sun their wav'd coats dropt with gold...
Page 92 - L'OUVERTURE TOUSSAINT, the most unhappy man of men! Whether the whistling Rustic tend his plough Within thy hearing, or thy head be now Pillowed in some deep dungeon's earless den; — O miserable Chieftain! where and when Wilt thou find patience?
Page 175 - Nor lonely the bird, nor his ghastly mate ; They are each unto each a pride — Thrice fonder, perhaps, since a strange dark fate Hath rent them from all beside ! So when the night falls, and dogs do howl, Sing Ho ! for the reign of the horned owl ! We know not alway who are kings by day, But the king of the night is the bold brown owl.
Page 175 - IN the hollow tree, in the old gray tower, The spectral owl doth dwell; Dull, hated, despised, in the sunshine hour, But at dusk he's abroad and well! Not a bird of the forest e'er mates with him; All mock him outright by day; But at night, when the woods grow still and dim, The boldest will shrink away!
Page 92 - O miserable Chieftain ! where and when Wilt thou find patience ! Yet die not; do thou Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow : Though fallen thyself, never to rise again, Live, and take comfort. Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies; There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee; thou has great allies; Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's unconquerable mind.
Page 139 - ... were come to dine with him. Had I been there I had been lost. But to return to the president and his pipe of tobacco. Before that was out I found the ground rolling and moving under my feet, upon which I said to him, Lord, sir, what is this ? He replied very composedly, being a very grave man, It is an earthquake ; be not afraid, it will soon be over.

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