The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being the Letters of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, John Adams, John Jay, Arthur Lee, William Lee, Ralph Izard, Francis Dana, William Carmichael, Henry Laurens, John Laurens, M. de Lafayette, M. Dumas, and Others, Concerning the Foreigh Relations of the United States During the Whole Revolution; Together with the Letters in Reply from the Secret Committee of Congress, and the Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Also, the Entire Correspondence of the French Ministers, Gerrard and Luzerne, with Congress. Published Under the Direction of the President of the United States, from the Original Manuscripts in the Department of State, Conformably to a Resolution of Congress, of March 27th, 1818, Volume 2

Front Cover
Jared Sparks
N. Hale and Gray & Bowen, 1829 - United States
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Contents

ceding letters Supplies furnished by Gardoqui
54
A Minute of the sixteen enclosed Bills
60
To Baron de Schulenburg Paris November 13th
62
To the Commissioners at Paris Vienna May 27th
64
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Berlin June
70
To Baron de Schulenburg Berlin June 20th 1777
76
To the King of Prussia Berlin July 1st 1777
85
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris July
87
To the President of Congress Paris May 31st
89
To Baron de Schulenburg Paris August 13th
93
Baron de Schulenburg to Arthur Lee Berlin
102
To Messrs Gardoqui and Sons at Bilboa Paris
105
ToDrBerkenhout Paris December 3d 1777
111
To Baron de Schulenburg Paris October 23d
115
Baron de Schulenburg to Arthur Lee Berlin
120
Messrs Franklin and Deane to M Gerard Passy
130
To Lord Shelburne Paris December 14th
132
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris Feb
133
To the President of Congress Paris March 19th
140
Gerard April 1st half past one oclock
144
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris April 5th 1778
150
To Count de Vergennes Chaillot April 24th 1778
156
Committee of Foreign Affairs to Arthur Lee York
159
Count de Vergennes to Arthur Lee Versailles
173
James Gardoqui to Arthur Lee Madrid August
180
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris
186
To James Gardoqui Paris October 6th 1778
192
Count de Vergennes to Arthur Lee Versailles
199
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris
205
Count de Vergennes to John Adams Versailles
227
Benjamin Franklin to Arthur Lee Passy Febru
229
Benjamin Franklin to Arthur Lee Passy March
236

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 329 - It is likewise agreed that it shall be wholly free for all merchants, commanders of ships and other citizens of both countries to manage themselves their own business in all the ports and places subject to the jurisdiction of each other, as well with respect to the consignment and sale of their goods and...
Page 332 - ... which by this treaty are to be esteemed free, neither may they be detained on pretence of their being as it were infected by the prohibited goods, much less shall they be confiscated, as lawful prize : but if not the whole cargo, but only part thereof shall consist of prohibited or contraband goods, and the commander of the ship shall be ready and willing to deliver them to the captor, who...
Page 334 - It shall be lawful for the ships of war of either party, and privateers, freely to carry whithersoever they please, the ships and goods taken from their enemies...
Page 337 - ... It shall be lawful for all and singular the subjects of the Most Christian King, and the citizens, people and inhabitants of the said United States, to sail with their ships with all manner of liberty and security, no distinction being made who are the proprietors of the merchandizes laden thereon, from any port to the places of those who now are or hereafter shall be at enmity with the Most Christian King or the United States.
Page 202 - It was stated, in an article of the treaty of alliance, to be its direct end, " to maintain effectually the liberty, sovereignty, and independence, absolute and unlimited, of the -United States, as well in matters of government as commerce.
Page 334 - ... no shelter or refuge shall be given in their ports to such as shall have made prize of the subjects, people, or property of either of the parties ; but if such shall come in, being forced by stress of weather, or the danger of the sea, all proper means shall be vigorously used, that they go out and retire from thence as soon as possible.
Page 339 - ... must be furnished with sea letters or passports, expressing the name, property, and bulk of the ship, as also the name and place of habitation of the master or commander of the said ship, that it may appear...
Page 409 - If the United States should think fit to attempt the reduction of the British power, remaining in the northern parts of America, or the islands of Bermudas, those countries or islands, in case of success, shall be confederated with or dependant upon the said United States.
Page 333 - ... shall forbear doing any damage to those of the other party, or committing any outrage against them; and if they act to the contrary they shall be punished, and shall also be bound in their persons and estates to make satisfaction and reparation for all damages, and the interest thereof, of whatever nature the said damages may be.
Page 413 - States, their liberty, sovereignty and independence, absolute and unlimited, as well in matters of government as commerce, and also their possessions, and the additions or conquests, that their confederation may obtain during the war, from any of the dominions now, or heretofore possessed by Great Britain in North America...