The Balkans and the Byzantine World before and after the Captures of Constantinople, 1204 and 1453

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Vlada Stanković
Lexington Books, Jun 15, 2016 - History - 248 pages
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This book represents the first attempt to analyze historical and cultural developments in late medieval and early modern southeastern Europe as a set of mutually intertwined regional histories, burdened by the strong dichotomy between the almighty center—Constantinople—and the periphery that is rarely visible in both contemporary sources and modern scholarship. This mosaic of original studies is devoted to various regions of the Byzantine Balkans and their historical, artistic, and ideological idiosyncrasies, mirroring the complex character and composite and fragmented structure of this vast region. The focal points of the book are the two captures of Constantinople in 1204 and 1453, and the contributors analyze the significance of these catastrophic events on the political destiny of medieval Balkan societies, the mechanisms of adapting to the new political order, and the ever-present interconnectedness of a lower, regional elite across southeastern Europe that had remained strong even after the Ottoman conquest.
 

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About the author (2016)

Vlada Stanković is professor of Byzantine studies and director of the Center for Cypriot Studies at the University of Belgrade.

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