Mortals and Others: Bertrand Russell's American Essays, 1931-1935, Volume 2

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Psychology Press, 1998 - Philosophy - 176 pages
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'Every man would like to be God, if it were possible; some few find it difficult to admit the impossibility.' - Bertrand Russell
From 1931-1935 Bertrand Russell was one of the regular contributors to the literary pages of the New York American, together with other distinguished authors, such as Aldous Huxley and Vita Sackville-West. Mortals and Others Volume II presents a further selection of his essays, ranging from the politically correct, to the perfectly obscure: from The Prospects of Democracy to Men Versus Insects.
Even though written in the politically heated climate of the 1930s, these essays are surprisingly topical and engaging for the present day reader. Volume II of Mortals and Others serves as a splendid, fresh introduction to the compassionate eclecticism of Bertrand Russell's mind.

 

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Contents

Politics and Sport
13
The Triumph of Stupidity
27
The Origin of Victorian Virtue
41
The Paralysis of Statesmanship
55
On Mediaevalism
68
The Churches and War
82
The Father of the Family
95
Egoism
109
Race and Nationality
123
On Curious Learning
137
Obscure Fame
149
Love of Money
155
On Being Insulting
162
Notes
168
Published Essay Titles
174
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About the author (1998)

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

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