The Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, November 30, 1864: A Monograph

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1897 - Franklin (Tenn.) - 351 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
21
III
37
IV
64
V
83
VI
91
VII
102
VIII
121
XII
160
XIII
172
XIV
180
XV
194
XVI
207
XVII
220
XVIII
233
XIX
243

IX
130
X
141
XI
148

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Page 274 - If, upon marches, guards or in quarters, different corps of the army shall happen to join or do duty together, the officer highest in rank of the line of the army, marine corps or militia, by commission, there on duty or in quarters, shall command the whole, and give orders for what is needful to the service, unless otherwise specially directed by the President of the United States, according to the nature of the case.
Page 328 - ... in view of the strong position we held, and reasoning from the former course of the rebels during this campaign, nothing appeared so improbable as that they would assault. I felt so confident in this belief that I did not leave General Sehofield's headquarters until the firing commenced.
Page 329 - My wound did not prevent my keeping the field, and General Cox kindly furnished me a remount. The rapidity of the firing made it very difficult to keep up the ammunition. The train being some two miles distant, on the road to Nashville, when the battle commenced, our greatest danger at one period of the battle was that we would exhaust our ammunition.
Page 328 - Ohio Batteries, broke and ran to the rear with the fugitives from Conrad's brigade. To add to the disorder the caissons of the two batteries galloped rapidly to the rear, and the enemy appeared on the breastworks and in possession of the two batteries, which they commenced to turn upon us.
Page 329 - ... our two bridges than the extremities of our line. Colonel Opdycke's brigade was lying down about one hundred yards in rear of the works. I rode quickly to the left regiment and called to them to charge ; at the same time I saw Colonel Opdycke near the centre of his line urging his men forward.
Page 308 - A short time before the infantry attack commenced the enemy's cavalry forced a crossing about three miles above Franklin, and drove back our cavalry, for a time seriously threatening our trains, which were accumulating on the north bank, and moving toward Nashville. I sent General Wilson orders, which he had, however, anticipated, to drive the enemy back at all hazards, and moved a brigade of General Wood's division to support him, if necessary. At the moment of the first decisive repulse of the...
Page 328 - The old soldiers all escaped, but the conscripts being afraid to run under fire, many of them were captured. Conrad's brigade entered the main line near the Columbia pike, Colonel Lane's several hundred yards to the right of the pike. A large proportion of Lane's men came back with loaded muskets, and, turning at the breastworks, they fired a volley into the pressing rebels now not ten steps from them.
Page 305 - Corps on the left and centre, covering the Columbia and Lewisburg pikes, and General Kimball's division of the Fourth Corps on the right, both flanks resting on the river. Two brigades of General Wagner's division were left in front to retard the enemy's advance, and General Wood's division, with...
Page 328 - ... forty minutes. When Wagner's division fell back from the heights south of Franklin, Opdycke's brigade was placed in reserve in rear of our main line, on the Columbia pike. Lane's and Conrad's brigades were deployed — the former on the right, the other the left of the pike — about three hundred yards in front of the main line.
Page 153 - ... locality his attack was not felt by the enemy till about one hour after dark. This division moved against the enemy's breastworks under a heavy fire of artillery and musketry, gallantly driving the enemy from portions of his line. The brigades of Sharp and Brantly (Mississippiaus) and of Deas (Alabamians) particularly distinguished themselves.

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