Charles Dickens' Works: Little dorrit

Front Cover
G.W. Carleton, 1885
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Contents

I
11
II
25
III
37
IV
50
V
53
VII
64
VIII
74
IX
84
XXXVII
412
XXXVIII
420
XL
435
XLI
440
XLII
455
XLIII
458
XLIV
473
XLV
488

X
95
XI
108
XII
127
XIII
137
XIV
146
XV
167
XVI
179
XVII
188
XVIII
201
XIX
210
XX
219
XXI
230
XXII
243
XXIII
252
XXIV
260
XXV
276
XXVI
291
XXVII
301
XXVIII
314
XXIX
326
XXX
333
XXXI
341
XXXII
356
XXXIII
371
XXXIV
380
XXXV
390
XXXVI
399
XLVI
499
XLVII
510
XLVIII
525
XLIX
533
L
538
LI
552
LII
569
LIII
577
LIV
593
LV
600
LVI
610
LVII
617
LVIII
632
LIX
642
LX
651
LXI
657
LXII
670
LXIII
680
LXV
689
LXVI
697
LXVII
712
LXVIII
730
LXIX
738
LXX
761
LXXI
770
LXXII
778
LXXIII
788

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Page 110 - Boards sat upon them, secretaries minuted upon them, commissioners gabbled about them, clerks registered, entered, checked, and ticked them off, and they melted away. In short, all the business of the country went through the circumlocution office, except the business that never came out of it ; and its name was legion.
Page 37 - Melancholy streets in a penitential garb of soot, steeped the souls of the people who were condemned to look at them out of windows, in dire despondency.
Page 40 - DROWNED, was weeping on the wet wall; he came at last to the house he sought. An old brick house, so dingy as to be all but black, standing by itself within a gateway. Before it, a square courtyard where a shrub or two and a patch of grass were as rank (which is saying much) as the iron railings enclosing them were rusty; behind it, a jumble of roots. It was a double house, with long, narrow, heavily-framed windows. Many years ago, it had had it in its mind to slide down sideways; it had been propped...
Page 462 - Father is rather vulgar, my dear. The word Papa, besides, gives a pretty form to the lips. Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes, and prism, are all very good words for the lips : especially prunes and prism.
Page 799 - They went quietly down into the roaring streets, inseparable and blessed ; and as they passed along in sunshine and shade, the noisy and the eager, and the arrogant and the froward and the vain, fretted, and chafed, and made their usual uproar.
Page 167 - To review his life, was like descending a green tree in fruit and flower, and seeing all the branches wither and drop off one by one, as he came down towards them.
Page 227 - There was a classical daughter once — perhaps — who ministered to her father in his prison as her mother had ministered to her. Little Dorrit, though of the unheroic modern stock, and mere English, did much more in comforting her father's wasted heart upon her innocent breast, and turning to it a fountain of love and fidelity that never ran dry or waned through all his years of famine.
Page 245 - He did not shine in company ; he had not very much to say for himself ; he was a reserved man, with a broad, overhanging, watchful head, that particular kind of dull red colour in his cheeks which is rather stale than fresh, and a somewhat uneasy expression about his coat-cuffs, as if they were in his confidence, and had reasons for being anxious to hide his hands.

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