Esoteric Psychology Vol II

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Lucis Publishing Companies, 1942 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 818 pages
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Five volumes have been written under the overall title of A Treatise on the Seven Rays, based on the fact, the nature, the quality and the interrelationship of the seven streams of energy pervading our solar system, our planet and all that lives and moves within its orbit. The first two volumes go extensively into the psychological make-up of a human being as the life, quality and appearance of an incarnating, evolving spiritual entity. They also relate the circumstance of a human psychology to world conditions and to future possibilities.
 

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Contents

Coyer
4
CHAPTER IIThe Ray of Personality
Humanity Todayl

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About the author (1942)

An extract from the Tibetan teacher, written in 1934 briefly explains the intent of these teachings: “The books that I have written are sent out with no claim for their acceptance. They may, or may not, be correct, true and useful. It is for you to ascertain their truth by right practice and by the exercise of the intuition. Neither I nor A.A.B. is the least interested in having them acclaimed as inspired writing, or in having anyone speak of them (with bated breath) as being the work of one of the masters. If they present truth in such a way that it follows sequentially upon that already offered in the world teachings, if the information given raises the aspiration and the will‑to‑serve from the plane of the emotions to that of the mind (the plane whereon the Masters can be found) then they will have served their purpose. If the teaching conveyed calls forth a response from the illumined mind of the worker in the world, and brings a flashing forth of the intuition, then let that teaching be accepted. But not otherwise. If the statements meet with eventual corroboration, or are deemed true under the test of the Law of Correspondences, then that is well and good. But should this not be so, let not the student accept what is said.”

  

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