Knowledge of Language: Its Nature, Origin, and Use

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1986 - Business & Economics - 307 pages
5 Reviews
Attempts to indentify the fundamental concepts of language, argues that the study of language reveals hidden facts about the mind, and looks at the impact of propaganda.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
0
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
2

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

A classic in mid-80's generative syntax. The main focus of the book is classical binding theory (again in the context of generative syntax), but there's also a nice introduction where Chomsky, in a rare moment, examines connections between his political work and his theoretical linguistics.
Not for the feint of heart, and probably only really comprehensible once you've taken an undergraduate syntax course or read a syntax textbook.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

If you're into Philosophy and understand how to read it, as well as interested in Language as a theory and science, you will LOVE this book. seriously just start with the opening chapter.

Contents

IV
1
V
15
VI
51
VII
221
VIII
276
IX
288
X
297
XI
309
XII
311
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xi - There's no use trying," she said: "one ca'n't believe impossible things." "I daresay you haven't had much practice," said the Queen. "When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1986)

omsky /f Noam

Bibliographic information