In the Beginning: A New Interpretation of Genesis

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Random House Publishing Group, Aug 10, 2011 - Religion - 208 pages
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BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Karen Armstrong's Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life.

In this fascinating book by the author of A History of God and Jerusalem, one of the best-known and least-understood books of the Bible is clarified for modern readers. Armstrong shows readers how the ancient tales of the Creation, the Fall, Cain and Abel, Noah, Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph illuminate our most profound and impenetrable problems.
 

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In the beginning: a new interpretation of Genesis

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The best-selling author of A History of God (LJ 9/15/93), Armstrong gives us here essentially a highly personal modern-day midrash. She interprets selected accounts of Genesis using an archetypal ... Read full review

Contents

Wrestling with God and Scripture
Beginnings
Creation
An Initial Complexity
Blessing
Fact or Fiction?
Separation
Knowledge
Rebekah
Jacob and Esau
The Blessing of Jacob
Jacobs Ladder
A Blessing or a Curse?
Jacob Agonistes
The Rape of Dinah
The Fall of Jacob

The Possibility of Evil
Sin and Curse
Cain and Abel
The Evil Inclination
The Flood
Noah
The Ark
The New Adam
The Tower of Babel
Abraham
Lot
Abraham and Pharaoh
The Friend of God
Family Values
Isaac
Joseph
Judah and Tamar
Joseph in Egypt
Recognition
Judahs Intervention
A Happy Ending?
Jacobs Blessing
No Last Word
GENESIS
Notes
53
Suggestions for Further Reading
54
Acknowledgments
55
About the Author
58
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Karen Armstrong is the author of numerous books on religion, including The Case for God, A History of God, The Battle for God, Holy War, Islam, Buddha, and Fields of Blood, as well as a memoir, The Spiral Staircase. Her work has been translated into 45 languages. In 2008 she was awarded the TED Prize and began working with TED on the Charter for Compassion, created online by the general public, crafted by leading thinkers in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. It was launched globally in the fall of 2009. Also in 2008, she was awarded the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Medal. In 2013, she received the British Academy’s inaugural Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Transcultural Understanding.

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