Jewish Emancipation Reconsidered: The French and German Models

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Michael Brenner, Vicki Caron, Uri R. Kaufmann
Mohr Siebeck, 2003 - History - 245 pages
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A group of distinguished historians makes the first systematic attempt to compare the experiences of French and German Jews in the modern era. The cases of France and Germany have often been depicted as the dominant paradigms for understanding the processes of Jewish emancipation and acculturation in Western and Central Europe. In the French case, emancipation was achieved during the French Revolution, and it remained in place until 1940, when the Vichy regime came to power. In Germany, emancipation was a far more gradual and piecemeal process, and even after it was achieved in 1871, popular and governmental antisemitism persisted. The essays in this volume, while buttressing many traditional assumptions regarding these two paths of emancipation, simultaneously challenge many others, and thus force us to reconsider the larger processes of Jewish integration and acculturation.
 

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Contents

Michaet Brenner
1
Frances Matino
27
Perrine SimonNahum
39
Cohen
55
Uri R Kaufmann
79
Sitvia Cresti
93
Eti BarChen
111
Christian Wiese
129
Jacques Ehrenfreund
155
Pierre Birnbaum
161
mel
169
Steven E Aschheim
199
Diana Pinto
221
Notes on Contributors
237
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About the author (2003)

Michael Brenner, ist Inhaber des Lehrstuhls fur Deutsches und Europaisches Verfassungs- und Verwaltungsrecht der Universitat Jena.Vicki Caron, Professor (Thomas and Diann Mann Chair) in Modern Jewish History at Cornell University.Uri R. Kaufmann, Taught at the Hochschule fur Judische Studien in Heidelberg and is currently working on a history of the Jews in Switzerland.

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