The Tradition of Natural Law: A Philosopher's Reflections

Front Cover
Fordham Univ Press, 1965 - Law - 194 pages
0 Reviews
The tradition of natural law is one of the foundations of Western civilization. At its heart is the conviction that there is an objective and universal justice which transcends humanity's particular expressions of justice. It asserts that there are certain ways of behaving which are appropriate to humanity simply by virtue of the fact that we are all human beings. Recent political debates indicate that it is not a tradition that has gone unchallenged: in fact, the opposition is as old as the tradition itself. By distinguishing between philosophy and ideology, by recalling the historical adventures of natural law, and by reviewing the theoretical problems involved in the doctrine, Simon clarifies much of the confusion surrounding this perennial debate. He tackles the questions raised by the application of natural law with skill and honesty as he faces the difficulties of the subject. Simon warns against undue optimism in a revival of interest in natural law and insists that the study of natural law beings with the analysis of the law of the land.He writes not as a polemicist but as a philosopher, and he writes of natural law with the same force, conciseness, lucidity and simplicity which have distinguished all his other works.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
xiii
PART ONE
1
THE PROBLEM
3
THE HISTORY OF NATURAL LAW
16
SOME THEORETICAL QUESTIONS
41
PART TWO
67
THE DEFINITION OF LAW
69
NATURAL LAW
110
THE FUTURE OF NATURAL LAW
159
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xvi - Another tradition, typified by Kant's dictum that one “[m}ust act as if the maxim of your action were to become through your will a universal law of nature,

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1965)


Yves R. Simon is author of several books, including The Definition of Moral Virtue and The Tradition of Natural Law available from Fordham University Press.

Bibliographic information